Stewart, B.C. Mayor Gina McKay poses for a photo with her partner Chris Fellers and their puppy Harper in this undated handout photo. The town of Stewart, B.C., is doing what it can to help neighbours in the smaller, more isolated Hyder, Alaska. Stewart Mayor Gina McKay said residents of Hyder don’t even have a gas station, and are allowed to cross into Stewart once a week for essentials like groceries. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO, Gina McKay

Travel restrictions inspiring co-operation in border communities

Small border towns are asking for exemption to travel ban

When the COVID-19 pandemic closed the Canada-U.S. border to non-essential travel, Donna Peter suddenly lost access to her nearest source of bulk groceries.

Peter is among about 100 residents of Beaver Creek, Yukon, who would drive two hours to Tok, Alaska, for much of their staple shopping.

“They have a grocery store there, a restaurant, a hardware store, a lumber yard. So, it’s very convenient for us,” she said.

“Usually that was our place to get away. Being on the border, where are you going to go? You go to Tok.”

Beaver Creek holds the title of Canada’s most westerly community and — just 20 minutes from the border — it usually serves as a friendly stop for travellers to take a break along the Alaska Highway.

Like other border towns forced to respond to a rapidly changing world, residents have rallied around one another with generosity and co-operation.

Early in the pandemic, the local White River First Nation offered to buy groceries for the whole town, whether an individual was a member of the First Nation or not, Peter said.

In co-ordination with the Beaver Creek Community Club, they planned a five-hour trip to Whitehorse and collected shopping lists from residents, prohibiting only cigarettes and alcohol, she said.

“They went to Whitehorse, they put themselves out there, they were wearing masks and loaded up truck after truck after truck of groceries. And they brought them back, took them all to the community club, sorted them by name and then delivered it to your home,” Peter said.

“We, of course, the town people, thanked them profusely.”

No one from the First Nation was available for an interview but executive director Sid Vander Meer said in an email that members have now done six or seven supply runs.

ALSO READ: Canada provides exception for U.S. students planning to study north of border

As a pitstop for many tourists, Beaver Creek’s businesses are also hurting during the pandemic.

Carmen Hinson, owner-operator of multi-service stop Buckshot Betty’s, said her business is down 90 to 95 per cent.

“We have a restaurant, a takeout liquor gift shop, cabins, campground, a little bit of everything,” she said.

“For us on the highway I mean it’s affecting us a lot.”

The town of Stewart, B.C., is also doing what it can to help neighbours in the smaller, more isolated Hyder, Alaska.

Stewart Mayor Gina McKay said residents of Hyder don’t even have a gas station and are allowed to cross into Stewart once a week for essentials like groceries.

“We really do see ourselves as one big community and I think actually this situation we’re all in right now with COVID has actually made us stronger because we’re doing everything we can to help them, whether that be bringing fuel to the border, groceries to the border, any essentials they need,” McKay said.

After McKay made similar comments at the outset of the pandemic, she said she got calls from media as far away as Abu Dhabi looking for a good news story, as gloom swept the globe.

“I don’t think when I made those comments in March any of us thought we would still be here at the end July,” McKay said.

Since then, she said residents on both sides of the border have formed a Stewart-Hyder COVID Action Committee petitioning both countries to allow locals to freely roam between the two communities.

McKay said her council passed a motion this week to support the petition and ask the Canada Border Services Agency and their local member of Parliament to make an exception for Hyder.

The CBSA did not respond to questions in time for deadline.

McKay said the kindness has gone both ways. She and her partner were “devastated” to lose their dog in March. They soon ordered a puppy from a breeder outside Seattle that wouldn’t be ready until June, not realizing the borders would close.

The Chow Chow, named Harper, made it thanks to an American breeder who put her on a charter float plane flight, a pilot who kept her for three days due to bad weather and a man in Hyder who brought her from the dock to the border.

“So that’s all of us working together. It took a lot to get that puppy here, but we got her,” McKay said.

Amy Smart, The Canadian Press


Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Want to support local journalism during the pandemic? Make a donation here.

Coronavirus

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Another death as COVID-19 outbreak at Delta Hospital climbs to 18 cases

Total of 12 patients and six staff in one unit have tested positive for COVID-19: Fraser Health

Telethon promotes Surrey Memorial Hospital COVID response funding

Entrepreneur Manjit Lit gifts Surrey Hospital Foundation, challenges others to join him

Stanley Cup win for Surrey-based NHL scout who coached in North Delta

Grant Armstrong is among 11 WHL alumni currently with Tampa Bay Lightning

CRIME STOPPERS: ‘Most wanted’ for the week of Sept. 27

Crime Stoppers’ weekly list based on information provided by police investigators

Wubs family donation buys priority equipment for Delta Hospital

Founder of Westland Insurance’s gift of $140,732 funding new gear for surgical services department

105 new COVID-19 cases, 1 death as health officials urge B.C. to remember safety protocols

There are currently 1268 active cases, with 3,337 people under public health monitoring

B.C. nurses report rise in depression, anxiety, exhaustion due to pandemic

A new UBC study looks into how the COVID-19 response has impacted frontline nurses

National child-care plan could help Canada rebound from COVID-induced economic crisis: prof

A $2 billion investment this year could help parents during second wave of pandemic

Search suspended for Indigenous elder last seen mushroom picking in northwest B.C.

Mushroom picker Thomas (Tommy) Dennis has been missing since Sept. 16

Join Black Press Media and Do Some Good

Pay it Forward program supports local businesses in their community giving

16 MLAs retiring from B.C. politics add up to $20M in pensions: Taxpayers Federation

Taxpayers pay $4 for every dollar MLAs contribute to their pensions

‘Bonnie’ and ‘Henry’ among latest litter of service dog puppies

B.C. Alberta Guide Dogs names two pups after provincial health officer

B.C. VOTES 2020: Few solutions offered for ‘out of control’ camping

B.C. Liberals, NDP spend millions as problem keeps growing

Action demanded over death of First Nations youth in Abbotsford group home

Family and Indigenous organizations push for thorough investigation

Most Read