Alex Browne photo                                Work at the PARC Oceana Retirement Living development continues this week following a concrete pour accomplished without public complaint, the city says.

Alex Browne photo Work at the PARC Oceana Retirement Living development continues this week following a concrete pour accomplished without public complaint, the city says.

No complaints registered on early-a.m. White Rock concrete pour

23-storey highrise project taking shape at city gateway

A recent major early-morning concrete pour at the Oceana PARC development at White Rock’s gateway happened without complaint from nearby residents and neighbouring visitors.

That’s the message from city communications manager Farnaz Farrokhi, who told Peace Arch News by email that a check with the planning department last week had revealed no complaints from the public about the pour at the site of the retirement residence.

Previously, early-morning cutting of trees along both sides of Johnston Road on Feb. 25 – associated with the redevelopment of the gateway area – was met with public ire.

Farrokhi said the concrete pour, conducted on Saturday, April 7, involved some 1,500 cubic metres of concrete for the “ground slab” of the planned 23-storey building, rapidly taking shape in the 1500-blocks of Johnston Road and George Street.

“Due to the slab’s large area, and its required structural continuity (it had to set all at once), all of the 1500 cubic metres had (to) be poured in one continuous time period,” she said.

The work for the day – the largest single concrete pour for the building – required a one-day noise extension, and contractor Ventana Construction notified neighbours and adjacent residents it would be taking place.

Although people in the area were notified that work would begin at 3:30 a.m., the actual pour took place between 6 a.m. and 6 p.m., Farrokhi said.

The time between 3:30 a.m. and 6 a.m. was required for traffic control and setup, she added.

“It required additional time to be set aside for set up and putting traffic control measures in place before the pour, and for cleanup after the pour,” Farrokhi said, noting that typical construction hours for the project are between 7 a.m. and 7:30 p.m. on weekdays, and 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Saturdays.

The pour involved a fleet of concrete trucks feeding three pumper trucks, Farrokhi added.