On the city’s to-do list for 2019-22 are a number of projects, including a new track and field facility at North Delta Secondary, upgrades to the change rooms at Sungod Recreation Centre and the construction of a second synthetic turf field at Mackie Park. (James Smith photos)

New track, synthetic field and change rooms in the works for North Delta

Projects included as short-term goals in Delta’s new parks and recreation strategic work plan

Several city facilities in North Delta parks are slated for improvements over the next four years, according to a new strategic plan from the parks, recreation and culture department.

The plan, which was brought to council on July 16, outlines projects that the department is looking to undertake across the city. Although these ventures have already been identified in a number of different city documents, the plan brings them all together.

Between 2019 and 2022, a number of projects in North Delta will potentially come to completion.

Renovating Sungod Recreation Centre’s change rooms is one of these short-term projects. This proposal, projected to cost $4 million, was originally identified in 2008 after the centre’s fitness area was expanded. The current change rooms are from 1978 and haven’t been updated since. The new facilities would have a modern layout and use “universal change room standards” to increase capacity and safety, according to the report.

Another short-term goal is to construct a second synthetic turf field (plus related amenities) at Mackie Park, to the tune of an estimated $5 million. Currently there has three such fields in South Delta and two in North Delta; this additional field would be adjacent to the existing field at Mackie Park.

RELATED: North Delta’s Mackie Park synthetic turf field officially open for sport

The state of North Delta Secondary’s track has been a contentious issue in the community of late, and it’s something the city plans to resolve before 2022.

This project comes out of several motions by council and the school board to upgrade Delta’s track and field facilities. Resurfacing of South Delta Secondary’s track is currently underway, but improvements needed at NDSS are far more extensive and will require more conversation on how funding could be sought. Potential grants from the provincial and federal governments would require the school district sell the track to the city.

The strategic plan lists the cost of upgrading Delta’s track and field facilities at between $350,000 and $10 million.

RELATED: South Delta track upgrades approved in first phase of long-term plan

The plan did not explicitly state when each of these projects would be completed, only that they were short-term priorities for the city.

There are also a number of ongoing projects outlined in the plan, including the playground replacement program. Annieville Lions Park is set for an upgrade in 2019, 81A Park and Wade Road Park playgrounds will be replaced in 2020, Huff Boulevard Park in 2021, 89A Park in 2022 and Delview Park in 2023.

The list continues for 15 years, and includes playgrounds in all three Delta communities. The projected replacement cost for each playground is between $80,000 and $100,000, with a total cost of up to $250,000 per year.

Three backstops at North Delta ball fields are set to be replaced: North Delta Community Park, Chalmers Park and Sunbury Park replaced in 2019, 2021 and 2023, respectively. Each replacement is expected to cost between $75,000 and $150,000.

Tennis courts at Chalmers Park, Dennison Park and Endersby park will be resurfaced in 2019, 2020 and 2021, respectively, to the tune of $300,000. These upgrades may include adding pickleball lines to some or all of the courts to meet growing demand in the community.

The strategic plan also includes medium- and long-term projects. Slated for North Delta between 2023 and 2027 are the construction of a covered lacrosse box ($1.75 million) and developing John Oliver Park into an extensive outdoor recreation complex, complete with synthetic turf fields, a cycling course, trail system, a permanent fieldhouse and additional parking. The massive plan comes with a hefty price tag upwards of $30 million.

Looking forward to 2028 and beyond, the plan envisions a new purpose-built seniors centre be constructed in central North Delta to replace the aging Kennedy Centre and a new building for the Hillside Boys and Girls Club. These projects are roughly estimated to cost the city $25 million and $20 million, respectively.

A full copy of the strategic work plan can be found online at deltacivicweb.net under reports for parks, recreation and culture in July 2018.



grace.kennedy@northdeltareporter.com

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