FILE – People walk past large letters spelling out UBC at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, B.C., on November 22, 2015. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Many B.C. post-secondary institutions say fall classes will be offered mostly online

Most campuses closed in March due to COVID-19

Many B.C. post-secondary institutions will lean towards online classes for the fall semester in an attempt to keep up with physical distancing measures to prevent the spread of COVID-19.

Post-secondary institutions throughout the country had largely closed their campuses and shifted online in March once COVID-19 made in-person classes impossible.

In a statement released Monday, the University of B.C. said it will offer “larger classes online with selected smaller classes conducted in-person” for the fall semester. The smaller in-person classes will adhere to physical distancing guidelines, president Santa J. Ono said, while online classes will allow for international students who cannot get into Canada in time for the term to begin.

In a message from Simon Fraser University, vice-president of academics Jonathan Driver said that “most classes will continue to be delivered through remote methods.” Some laboratory-based classes, field trips, and graduate student classes will be offered in person.

In a statement, Kwantlen Polytechnic University said it is planning for the fall semester but “it is too early to talk about those plans.”

University of Victoria president Jamie Cassels said classes will be offered “predominantly online” in the fall, although some services and necessary classes will return to campus with physical distancing measures. Nanaimo’s Vancouver Island University said it will go to a “hybrid program delivery model” for the fall semester, combining both face-to-face and online classes.

Langara College said classes that can be offered remotely will remain online for fall, while course that necessitate face-to-face instruction will be offered on campus.

In a statement, Thompson Rivers University said it would hold on-campus classes “responsibly with face-to-face course delivery where possible,” and remote learning will continue for the rest of the curriculum.

The University of the Fraser Valley said more updates are to come but that “alternate forms of delivery” will continue for many classes during the fall semester.

Up north, the University of Northern B.C. said most classes will be offered remotely. In the Kootenays, Selkirk College said fall course delivery will depend on multiple factors.

“Each will have specific exposure control plans in place to achieve physical distancing, hygiene, new requirements for personal protective equipment and cleaning regimes,” a statement on the college website said.

READ MORE: B.C. universities opt out of in-person spring graduation ceremonies


@katslepian

katya.slepian@bpdigital.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

CoronavirusPost-secondary EducationUniversities and Colleges

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Delta council approves plan to reopen city facilities

Next phase of plan includes outdoor pools, summer day camps, outdoor fitness programs

Surrey student earns TD Community Leadership scholarship

Harjot Bal recognized for his One Blood For Life Foundation

‘Pods’ set up at Surrey homeless centre

Temporary shelter set up in April to help stop the spread of COVID-19

Suspect sought in alleged indecent act in South Surrey

Police say incident occurred near 13 Avenue and 131 Street

New Serpentine rail bridge completed in Cloverdale-Sullivan

$3 million crossing replacement marks first of 13 flood-mitigation projects

‘I’m pissed, I’m outraged’: Federal minister calls out police violence against Indigenous people

Indigenous Minister Marc Miller spoke on recent incidents, including fatal shooting of a B.C. woman

Kelowna Mountie who punched suspect identified, condemned by sister

‘How did he get away with this? How is this justifiable?’

PHOTOS: Anti-racism protesters gather in communities across B.C.

More protests are expected through the weekend

Facing changes together: Your community, your journalists

Importance of accurate, ethical reporting more critical than ever

Pair accused of ‘horrific’ assault at Vancouver’s Oppenheimer Park at large

Police say Jason Tapp, 30, and Nicole Edwards, 33, did not show up to meet their bail supervisor this week

IHIT names homicide victim found in the Fraser Canyon this week

Police asking for tips into the suspicious death of 29-year-old Alicia Berg

No charges to be laid against 22 northern B.C. pipeline protesters

Twenty-two people were arrested in February, but Crown has decided not to pursue charges

Plan in place for BC Ferries to start increasing service levels

Ferry corporation reaches temporary service level agreement with province

Most Read