Members of the news media surround U.S. president Donald Trump in a scene from Fred Peabody’s documentary movie, “The Corporate Coup d’État.”

Film director Peabody in White Rock for screening of ‘The Corporate Coup d’État’ doc

In Surrey, Fred Peabody got his start in broadcasting at a Guildford-area school in the mid-1960s

Surrey-raised filmmaker Fred Peabody will be at White Rock Community Centre for a screening of his latest documentary movie, The Corporate Coup d’État, on Friday, Oct. 25.

The event, which starts at 7 p.m. and will include a post-screening Q&A with the director, is part of a series of films shown by White Rock Social Justice Film Society, at 15154 Russell Ave.

The film shows how “Donald Trump and right-wing populist movements around the world are the logical result of a creeping, corporate coup d’état that has taken over established political parties, both ‘liberal’ and ‘conservative,’” says a post at whiterocksocialjusticefilmsociety.ca.

“This film tells the story of how the coup happened and shows its disastrous effects on society’s most vulnerable citizens. The corporate coup d’état has been devastating for people in ‘sacrifice zones’ like the U.S. Rust Belt and Camden, New Jersey, where the film captures heart-breaking stories of citizens suffering from the effects of corporatist, globalist, and neo-liberal ideologies and policies.”

The CORPORATE COUP D'ÉTAT – Trailer from WhitePinePictures on Vimeo.

Peabody, now a Vancouver resident, also made the documentary All Governments Lie: Truth, Deception and the Spirit of the I.F. Stone, which was given a Directors Guild of Canada award a year after its 2016 release.

In Surrey in the mid-1960s, the filmmaker got his start in broadcasting while roaming the hallways of Mary Jane Shannon junior high, later renamed Guildford Park Secondary. Peabody’s career in news media later took him to Toronto, New York and Los Angeles, to work on investigative-news TV shows including The Fifth Estate, 20/20 and Dateline NBC.

• READ MORE: How award-winning doc movie director Fred Peabody got his start at Surrey school.

In 1969, while on assignment in Montreal, Peabody spent several hours interviewing John Lennon and Yoko Ono during their famous hotel “Bed-In” for peace.

“We talked for hours, and he (Lennon) asked me to come back the next day,” Peabody told the Now-Leader in June. “I suppose I was asking more intelligent questions than he’d usually get, and on that second day a photographer took a photo of me with Lennon. So later, the photographer told me that after I left, they wheeled a bunch of recording equipment into the room and they all got to sing on a new song.… So I came that close to singing on ‘Give Peace a Chance.’”



tom.zillich@surreynowleader.com

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