Marijuana edibles can come in all shapes and sizes, everything from gummy bears to cereals. (Delta Police Department photo)

Marijuana edibles can come in all shapes and sizes, everything from gummy bears to cereals. (Delta Police Department photo)

Delta police, school district to hold cannabis info session

Presentation at North Delta Secondary on Dec. 5. about the different ways marijuana can be consumed

Parents will be able to learn a little bit more about the different ways youth might be using pot at a presentation at North Delta Secondary on Dec. 5.

The presentation, a partnership between the Delta Police Department and the Delta School District, will inform parents on some of the different ways marijuana can be consumed: as edibles and through things like vapourizers or vape pens.

“The average parent likely has no knowledge that these things are out there,” Const. Derek Gallamore said in a DPD press release. Gallamore has experience in policing people who deal in things like edibles, and wants to share what he’s learned with the public.

“Earlier this year I arrested someone for trafficking strictly in edibles. I’d never seen anything like the range of these types of products that they had available,” Gallamore said in the release.

READ MORE: Delta police officer raises concerns about online edible sales

His concern centered around the THC content in edibles and vapes, which was “through the roof.” THC is the active compound in marijuana that gets people high.

“The THC in edibles, or vapes, can be as high as nearly 100 per cent,” he said. By comparison, he said, the THC content in a typical joint might be around 25 per cent.

The way marijuana is consumed affects the type and length of high — eating an edible typically means a longer high, while smoking tends to deliver a more immediate one — and the amount of pot is also an important factor. But some edibles may not have clearly marked serving sizes, which could potentially lead to THC poisoning.

Because edibles and vape products are often marketed and designed in a way that can appeal to youth — some edibles have names like Cap’n Munch, Chronic Toast Crunch and Frooty Loopys, while vape pens can look like key fobs or flash drives — Gallamore wants to share his knowledge with parents.

The presentation will take place at North Delta Secondary School (11447 82nd Ave.) from 7 to 8:30 p.m. on Wednesday, Dec. 5. The presentation is open to the public and free to attend.

Additional resources for parents and teachers on cannabis can be found online at fraserhealth.ca/health-topics-a-to-z/cannabis#.W_xlCIyPI2w.

SEE ALSO: B.C. woman files lawsuit after high-THC cannabis product mislabelled



editor@northdeltareporter.com

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