A group of high school students gather at a makeshift memorial for their friend Jack Stroud, 15, who was struck and killed by an Amtrak passenger train on July 4, 2018. (File photo)

OUR VIEW: Surrey train tragedy a safety reminder for us all

Summer typically brings cautionary tales

If this pandemic has taught us – many of us, anyway – how fleeting and precious this gift of life is, summer also typically brings with it cautionary tales.

With these, we hear of life-altering injuries or even death after a child falls from a couple of storeys of a townhouse because someone left a window open to enjoy a summer breeze. Or of someone drowning after swimming out too far, or the mayhem resulting from a cigarette butt carelessly tossed onto a parched forest floor.

Some tragedies are unavoidable.

Others are not.

Most of us, especially young people, give not a shadow of a thought to the prospect that today could be our last.

A coroner has determined that South Surrey teenager Jack Stroud’s death in the summer of 2018 resulted from a risky game played on the BNSF railway tracks in Crescent Beach. The 15-year-old was struck by a train.

READ ALSO: ‘Dangerous game’ on rail line killed South Surrey teen in 2018: Coroner

It’s common, again especially for young people, to take risks. This is simply because death, at least to people Jack’s age, seems to be far over the horizon – a far-away event in life that happens when one is old and gray, and after a full and lengthy life has been lived.

Sadly, it doesn’t always work that way.

This summer we should all strive to make sure this young fellow’s untimely and accidental death was not in vain.

We can accomplish this by embracing safe practices for ourselves and our loved ones, wherever we are and whatever we are doing, not only this summer but into the foreseeable future.

Now-Leader



edit@surreynowleader.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Editorial Surrey OUR VIEW Now-Leader opinion

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Families with dispute-resolution issues to get help in Surrey

Model was first introduced in Victoria in 2019

Construction underway for new Cloverdale elementary school

The $33 million school is to seat 655 students

George Garrett retires from Volunteer Cancer Drivers Society board

Society completes more than 58,000 trips since 2016

B.C. families financially affected by pandemic eligible for grocery gift cards

Program open to struggling families in Lower Mainland and Fraser Valley communities

Quirky Canadian comedy ‘Schitt’s Creek’ takes Emmys by storm with comedy sweep

Toronto-raised Daniel Levy and Ottawa-born Annie Murphy both got supporting actor nods

181 days gone: Family continues to look for man last seen in RCMP custody 6 months ago

Brandon Sakebow’s last known location was leaving Mission RCMP cell, police say; family has doubts

Mission poker player missing in Nevada is found alive and safe

Brad Booth went missing in July 13, found in mid September

B.C. unveils new cannabis sales programs to help small, Indigenous growers

Government did not say how it will define small producers, but says nurseries will be included in the policy

B.C. transportation minister will not seek re-election

Claire Trevena has held the position since 2017

Young B.C. cancer survivor rides 105-km with Terry Fox’s brother

Jacob Bredenhof and Darrell Fox’s cycling trek raises almost $90,000 for cancer research

VIDEO: Shots fired outside Langley gas station that was scene of 2018 homicide

No reports of injuries in Saturday evening incident

B.C. migrant, undocumented workers rally for permanent residency program

Rally is part of the Amnesty for Undocumented Workers Campaign led by the Migrant Workers Centre

Most Read