White Rock’s Ruth Johnson Park, Coldicutt Ravine closed after ‘slope failures’

Repair work, assessment underway after rain damages stability

A section of White Rock’s Ruth Johnson Park and the Coldicutt Ravine have been closed to the public after recent rainfall caused “slope failures that threaten public safety.”

According to a news release issued Thursday afternoon, the City of White Rock closed Coldicutt Ravine on Jan. 31 after rainy weather “resulted in significant damage to the ravine and lower portion of Ruth Johnson Park.”

The city said the ravine would remain closed “for an indefinite period.”

Repairs to areas of Ruth Johnson Park are currently underway and some trails may re-open by late next week, the release notes. Two areas of the park will remain closed, however, while slope monitoring and assessment takes place. That work, the city added, could take “a number of weeks.”

• READ ALSO: Students, volunteers plant 300 trees in Ruth Johnson Park

City staff are currently working with geotechnical engineers to collect data, review assessments and consider possible solutions for the park and ravine. Signage is currently on site alerting visitors to the closures, though the city said improved signage and barricades will soon be in place in the closed areas of the park.

“I urge people in White Rock to pay attention to the signage and stay out of the… the closed areas,” said White Rock Mayor Darryl Walker.

“This is for your own safety. If you ignore the signs and the barricades, you may put yourself in the pathway of several tons of debris if one of the slope failures releases into a slide.”



editorial@peacearchnews.com

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