Mark Breslauer, chief executive of United Way Greater Victoria. (Black Press Media file photo)

United Way, Vancity program helps Lower Mainland non-profits ‘Survive and Thrive’

Program helps non-profits, charities, social enterprises and co-ops with post-pandemic recovery

A new program aims to provide some much-needed assistance to not-for-profit organizations and social enterprises in the region.

Vancity and United Way Greater Victoria have come together to fund Survive and Thrive, a program to help organizations chart a road to recovery post COVID-19.

Survive and Thrive will help a minimum of 20 organizations navigate day-to-day realities and support them in preparation for a recovery phase. Experts at Scale Collaborative – supported by the partnership of United Way of Greater Victoria and Vancity – will deliver the program.

READ ALSO: Vancity temporarily cuts credit card interest rates to zero for those in need

Helping organizations transform through financial diversification, enterprise and scaling, Scale Collaborative helps curate a supportive environment for enterprise organizations to thrive.

Organizations in the community social service sector such as non-profits, charities, social enterprises and co-ops might have to scale up to meet increased demand, shift to a new delivery model or services or even hibernate to get by. Survive and Thrive combines group coaching, individual and peer support, webinars and resources to help organizations who are struggling create a new business model.

Non-profits, charities, social enterprises and co-op organizations on Vancouver Island and the Lower Mainland can apply for the program. To qualify, groups are encouraged to complete a short application at scalecollaborative.ca/surviveandthrive. Applications are accepted on a rolling basis and approved organizations receive about two months of immediate support.

READ ALSO: United Way Greater Victoria launches Local Love in a Global Crisis

United Way Greater Victoria’s chief executive Mark Breslauer said the program is one of many announcements expected to come from United Way’s Local Love in a Global Crisis Fund.

“The impact of COVID-19 will be lasting and there is growing concern about the community sector’s capacity to adapt operations in order to continue to provide services for our most vulnerable citizens,” Breslauer said in a statement. “Survive and Thrive is an innovative solution to this difficult situation.”

Scale Collaborative co-founder Kristi Rivait said that while organizations and social enterprises are responding to increased and different community needs, they are facing new financial realities at the same time.

“Survive and Thrive supports leaders as they navigate their operations and finances in these transitional times,” Rivait said.

shalu.mehta@blackpress.ca


Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

CoronavirusUnited Way

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Police watchdog investigating death of man in Delta

Independent Investigations Office asking for witnesses to May 29 incident at Tsawwassen ferry terminal

Love flourishes at Peace Arch Park, but COVID-19 concerns loom

South Surrey park becomes only place for international couples to meet

Human Rights Tribunal denies church’s request to toss out White Rock Pride Society’s complaint

Star of the Sea and White Rock Pride Society to go to Human Rights Tribunal hearing

UPDATE: Missing 12-year-old boy found, Surrey RCMP say

Landon Vangeel-Morgan was last seen 9:14 p.m., May 30 near 96 Avenue and 150 Street

COVID-19: Daily update on pandemic in Surrey, White Rock and beyond

Provincial Health Officer officially bans overnight kids’ camps this summer

VIDEO: Injured bald eagle rescued in B.C. First Nations community

Bird suspected injured in fight, whisked off to Coquitlam rehab

Toronto Raptors’ Ujiri says conversations about racism can no longer be avoided

Thousands have protested Floyd’s death and repeated police killings of black men across the United States

‘I’m afraid’: Witnesses of wolf attack on senior near Prince Rupert worried about safety

Frank Russ shows where the unprovoked wolf attacked his father

Facing changes together: Your community, your journalists

Importance of accurate, ethical reporting more critical than ever

Protesters prepare to rally against racism in front of Vancouver Art Gallery

Rally is in response to the deaths of black Americans and a Toronto woman

Protesters rally against anti-black, Indigenous racism in Toronto

Police estimated the crowd to be between 3,500 and 4,000 and said there was no violence

Feds earmark $1.5M to support recovery of B.C., Indigenous tourism

B.C. money will be split between Vancouver Island and Indigenous tourism

‘We’re sick of it’: Anger over police killings shatters U.S.

Tens of thousands marched to protest the death of George Floyd

Most Read