Development cost charges in South Surrey’s Campbell Heights region are proposed to increase by nearly 10 per cent. (File photo)

Surrey eyes boost to development cost charges

Proposed rates could take effect mid-May

The City of Surrey is proposing to increase its development cost charges (DCCs) to boost available funds for a bevy of projects planned over the next decade, including a 20 Avenue overpass of Highway 99 in South Surrey.

City officials shared the proposed increases at an open house earlier this month at city hall, noting the boosts reflect updated costs for projects such as the overpass which are in its 10-year servicing (2020-2029) plan and parkland acquisition program; updated growth projections; and a two per cent reduction in the parkland ‘municipal assist factor.’

The latter change means 99 per cent of development-related capital costs is to be borne through DCCs. (The magnitude of the MAF, according to the provincial government, “reflects Council’s desire to encourage development and is largely a political decision.”)

City staff anticipate bringing the 2020 DCC bylaw to council for consideration in early February. If endorsed by council and, subsequently, by the provincial inspector of municipalities, the rates would take effect in mid-May.

DCCs are fees levied by the city on development applicants “to fund the costs of expanding and upgrading the City’s road, water, drainage and sewer services, and for parkland acquisition or improvement, to meet the needs of projected growth that’s expected to occur within the next 10 years,” according to information online.

READ MORE: Development cost charges could triple in parts of Metro Vancouver under new proposal

According to a July 2019 report, the city received approximately $91.8 million in DCC contributions in 2018, bringing its reserve account balance to just over $278 million as of the end of that year. The total included nearly $59 million in receivables.

Meanwhile, the city spent approximately $68.4 million in DCC contributions that year, including $3.5 million in South Surrey’s Campbell Heights region. Another $128 million was allocated to projects that started in or prior to 2018, while a further $76 million was earmarked for projects that had started or were to start in 2019.

Among recent parkland acquisitions funded by DCCs was that of property at 1916 176 St., for the expansion of Redwood Park, and of 18271 73 Ave. in west Clayton, for a neighbourhood park.

The proposed increases for 2020 include a citywide six per cent jump for single-family land uses, to $43,586 per lot from the $41,220 charged in 2018, while a jump of approximately three per cent is eyed for the per-acre DCC rate for industrial use, to $94,216 from $91,807.

For the Campbell Heights neighbourhood, the proposed increase is closer to 10 per cent, to $162,136 per acre from $147,837, and would apply to all zones and land uses, according to information shared at the Jan. 8 open house. A similar increase is proposed for commercial zones and land uses in the Highway 99 corridor, from 164 Street to 28 Avenue.

Surrey has charged DCCs since 1979, and developers have two years from the date of subdivision approval or the granting of a building permit to pay them in full, according to the July 2019 report to council.

Applications underway at the time that the bylaw receives final reading will have one year to complete in order to qualify for current DCC rates.



tholmes@peacearchnews.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Former Surrey Eagle home from ‘quiet, empty’ Italy after hockey season cancelled

Delta-born Anthony Bardaro has spent last three seasons playing professionally in Europe

Delta council passes bylaw to fine people who don’t socially distance, respect closures

Not social distancing or obeying provincial orders in Delta could set you back hundreds of dollars

Social media a blessing and a curse during time of crisis: B.C. communication expert

‘In moments of crisis, fear is very real and palpable,’ says SFU’s Peter Chow-White

OBITUARY: Sherrold Haddad brought giant Canadian flag to Surrey car dealership, built community

‘An amazing man, business person and community leader,’ friend Bruce Hayne posted to Facebook

COVID-19: Daily update on the pandemic in Surrey, White Rock, Delta and beyond

MARCH 28: Delta council passes bylaw to fine people who don’t socially distance

Evening world update: U.S. restrictions extended 30 days; NY deaths near 1,000

Comprehensive world update, with the latest developments in the COVID-19 crisis

‘It’s up to us: Recently-returned B.C. couple urges Canadians to take COVID-19 seriously

Garrett Kucher and Tory Apostoliuk make it home after almost a week of lockdown in Spain

‘Nothing concrete’: Tenants, landlords lack details after B.C. unveils COVID-19 rental aid

Single mom in Golden says she’s already going to the food bank after being laid off

Canada will make sure masks sent by China meet quality standards: Trudeau

Chinese Embassy tweeted that China was sending 30,000 medical masks along with gowns, gloves and goggles

B.C. issues guidelines about distancing, reusable bags to grocery stores amid COVID-19

Hand sanitizer and markers to keep lines two metres are apart are needed, province says

No plans to call in military right now to enforce COVID-19 quarantine: Trudeau

Trudeau unveils $7.5M for Kids Help Phone, $9M for vulnerable seniors amid COVID-19

QUIZ: How much do you know about the Olympics?

Put your knowledge to the test with these 12 questions

B.C. announces $3M for food banks to increase capacity during COVID-19

It is not clear how much of the money will flow towards Greater Victoria food banks

Most Read