Scientist to host information session in White Rock on heavy metals in water

The Impact of Heavy Metals and Pesticides in Drinking Water event scheduled for Aug. 23

The White Rock Lead, Arsenic and Manganese Working Group is to host a public information session on the health impacts of heavy metals in drinking water.

Impact of Heavy Metals & Pesticides in Drinking Water… Why a Little Bit is Too Much event organizer Ross Buchanan invited Dr. Bruce Lanphear to White Rock Aug. 23. to tell residents of the biological consequences of toxic chemicals in water.

Lanphear is a professor for the faculty of health sciences at Simon Fraser University.

According to his profile on the SFU website, Lanphear’s research interest include examining fetal and early childhood exposures to environmental neurotoxins including lead, pesticides, mercury, alcohol, and environmental tobacco smoke.

“His focus is on little things that matter. How little amounts of exposure, low dose exposure, can have lifelong impacts,” Buchanan told Peace Arch News Friday.

The City of White Rock and Fraser Health have said that White Rock water is safe to drink.

“I’ve come to believe that the city and Fraser Health are either incapable or unwilling to provide safe drinking water. So, beyond what they may or may not do, I want to give people the availability of the science. What the science is from an independent scientist who specializes in heavy metal contamination,” Buchanan said.

According to the city’s Metal Water Testing Results, White Rock water exceeded its manganese guideline limit (0.05 mg/L) 12 out of 15 times this year and in some cases, the results were four times the limit.

However, arsenic, copper, lead and iron all tested below the guideline limit.

Buchanan, who considers himself a public health advocate, says he has a concern with agricultural pesticides seeping into White Rock aquifers.

The free event is to take place Aug. 23, 7 p.m., at the Centennial Arena meeting hall.

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