Delta staff estimate it will cost $6,500 to install a similar to the one in White Rock’s Five Corners neighbourhood. (Aaron Hinks photo)

Rainbow crosswalk could cost Delta $6,500

Crosswalk one of several ways identified by Delta staff to show city’s support for LGBTQ community

City staff estimates that painting a rainbow in a Delta crosswalk to ‘“proactively support diversity and inclusion” of the LGBTQ community would cost $6,500.

Last month, in response to a letter from Sher Vancouver LGBTQ Friends Society founder Alex Sangha asking the city to implement services to benefit its LGBTQ population, council tasked staff and the newly-established community liveability advisory committee to look into what the city can do to show its inclusivity and better support the LGBTQ community.

READ MORE: Delta to address inclusion and services for LGBTQ community

On Monday night (March 4), council received a report from acting director of corporate services Mel Cheesman that reiterated council’s directive to refer the issue to its new committee, while also recommending that city staff develop a strategy to promote diversity and inclusion.

“The importance of seeing oneself reflected in society increases a person’s self-worth, sense of belonging and overall mental health,” the report reads. “Visible reminders to a community that diversity is something of value also support the development of an inclusive and welcoming city.”

The report goes on to list 43 communities in B.C. that have already installed rainbow crosswalks, and says a single 12-metre rainbow crosswalk will cost the city an estimated $6,500. Other symbols of inclusion in Delta could include rainbow benches, murals and street banners, though there were no cost estimates for any of those options.

According to the report, “Delta’s Social Profile indicates a need for more communication with the LGBTQ community to bring Delta in-line with other cities,” adding there are “relatively few” events in Delta that support said community.

“Outwardly visible symbols of diversity and inclusiveness must be supported with a sustainable commitment to changing behaviour, understanding and acceptance,” the report says. “This can be done through policies and actions that reinforce the messaging around diversity and inclusiveness.”

The report stops short of recommending where Delta’s first rainbow crosswalk should be, though it notes an email staff received from a Delta resident suggesting an unnamed location in central Tsawwassen.

Delta North MLA Ravi Kahlon said in an open letter to mayor and council Feb. 26 that he would like to see one at the intersection of 112th Street and 84th Avenue.

“This will serve as a visual reminder that everyone is welcome in Delta. We all make up the beautiful fabric of our community in our own diverse ways,” he wrote.

READ MORE: LETTER: Congrats to Delta council for supporting LGBTQ community

In determining the city’s strategy for promoting diversity and inclusion, the report directs staff to consult with local businesses and community groups to determine the level of support for city-led LGBTQ initiatives and “what a city contribution might look like.”

The next step is for staff and the community liveability advisory committee to report back to council with recommendations, though no deadline has been given. Delta council finalized the committee’s membership on Monday and notification letters will be sent out by the end of the week, according to a city spokesperson. No word yet on when the names of the committee members will be publicly available.

The date of the community liveability advisory committee’s first meeting is yet to be determined.

SEE ALSO: Delta celebrates pride with inaugural picnic



editor@northdeltareporter.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Just Posted

Second annual Delta Pride Picnic to highlight LGBTQ+ inclusion

This year’s event is slated for Saturday, Aug. 31 at Memorial Park in Ladner

White Rock RCMP seeking information about Aug. 16 assault

Man in 60s was injured around same time Paul Prestbakmo was stabbed to death

New recovery house rules, increased funding aim to prevent overdose tragedy

Changes ‘speak to issues’ highlighted by death of South Surrey’s Zachary Plett

Cloverdale DebuTheatre play heading to Vancouver Fringe Festival

Legoland will run through September at the Cultch as part of Dramatic Works Series

North Delta crime beat, week of Aug. 11

A selection of property crimes submitted weekly by the Delta Police Department

B.C. sockeye returns drop as official calls 2019 ‘extremely challenging’

Federal government says officials are seeing the same thing off Alaska and Washington state

Expanded support to help B.C. youth from care attend university still falling short

Inadequate support, limited awareness and eligibility restrictions some of the existing challenges

Ethnic media aim to help maintain boost in voting by new Canadians

Statistics Canada says new Canadians made up about one-fifth of the voting population in 2016

Cross-examination begins for B.C. dad accused of killing young daughters

Andrew Berry is charged in the deaths of six-year-old Chloe and four-year-old Aubrey in 2017

Dog attacked by river otters, Penticton owner says

Marie Fletcher says her dog was pulled underwater by four river otters in the Penticton Channel

BC SPCA overwhelmed with cats, kittens needing homes

Large number of cruelty investigations, plus normal ‘kitten season’ to blame

Memorial to deceased teen stays in place through Labour Day

Hundreds of tributes have been left at the Walnut Grove skate park

Wife charged in husband’s death in Sechelt

Karin Fischer has been charged with second-degree murder in the death of her husband, Max

Most Read