Staff members stand at a window as they watch a parade of well wishers as they drive through Orchard Villa Care home, in Pickering, Ont. on Saturday, April 25, 2020. Experts say the path to fixing long-term care in Canada after the pandemic is not clear, but all agree it starts with improving work conditions for carers. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young

No easy fix for long-term care, but it starts with working conditions: experts

Many of Canada’s COVID-19 deaths have been at longterm care homes

Experts say the path to fixing long-term care after the COVID-19 pandemic is not clear, but many agree it starts with improving conditions for the caregivers who work in them.

Policy-makers and politicians have vowed to fix Canada’s neglected long-term care system in the wake of the disastrous outbreaks of the novel coronavirus, leading to the deaths of thousands of people in nursing and retirement homes.

The Canadian Labour Congress has released 21 recommendations to improve conditions once the pandemic is over, including higher wages and providing full-time status to workers.

The group also recommends Canada put an end to private care homes and improve federal oversight by incorporating the facilities into the Canada Health Act.

Dr. Samir Sinha with the National Institute on Ageing says it may be too early in the pandemic to know if private or public homes are faring better, but data will help inform a review once the crisis is over.

Health Minister Patty Hajdu says she would be interested in such a review, so Canada can make changes to ensure that seniors are allowed to age in safety and dignity.

READ MORE: B.C. will ‘have to find a way’ for families to visit seniors in longterm care: advocate

The Canadian Press


Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Want to support local journalism during the pandemic? Make a donation here.

CoronavirusSeniors

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Surrey School District forecasts up to 30 per cent of students will return to class this week

Education Minister Rob Fleming said on June 1, about 60,000 B.C. children returned to school

Video tribute to KPU’s spring grad class also honours Andrew Petter, Bill Wright

‘We still want to celebrate our graduates, their achievements, and their resilience’

Surrey baseball association loses ‘a true giant’ in Bruce Lawson

Longtime volunteer ‘always gave his heart and soul to Surrey Canadian and the game of baseball’

Surrey Mounties respond to report of shots fired in Cloverdale

They took 12 people into custody but found no evidence shots were actually fired

Clover Valley Beer Festival cancelled

Cloverdale beer fest falls victim to COVID-19

B.C. records four new COVID-19 cases, Abbotsford hospital outbreak cleared

Four senior home outbreaks also declared over, eight still active

RCMP, coroner investigate murder-suicide on Salt Spring Island

Two dead, police say there is no risk to the public

About 30% of B.C. students return to schools as in-class teaching restarts amid pandemic

Education minister noted that in-class instruction remains optional

Trudeau avoids questions about anti-racism protesters dispersed for Trump photo-op

Prime minister says racism is an issue Canadians must tackle at home, too

Facing changes together: Your community, your journalists

Importance of accurate, ethical reporting more critical than ever

B.C.’s Law Enforcement Torch Run for Special Olympics goes virtual

The annual event partnering RCMP with Special Olympians is dramatically altered by COVID-19

Bateman program encourages people to sketch outside, connect with nature

#MyNatureSketch initiative encourages Canadians to become ‘bright-eyed three year olds’

Be cautious expanding COVID-19 bubble, Dr. Bonnie Henry tells B.C.

Senior homes stay off-limits as schools, businesses reopen

Most Read