Signs for Delta North candidates Jet Sunner (BC Liberals), Neema Manral (BC Greens) and Ravi Kahlon (BC NDP) at the corner of Scott Road and 64th Avenue on Oct. 13, 2020. (James Smith photo)

Signs for Delta North candidates Jet Sunner (BC Liberals), Neema Manral (BC Greens) and Ravi Kahlon (BC NDP) at the corner of Scott Road and 64th Avenue on Oct. 13, 2020. (James Smith photo)

NDP out-spent opponents in race for Delta North

Meanwhile, BC Liberals spent nearly eight times more in Delta South than NDP, Green Party combined

The BC NDP out-spent the BC Liberals by more than $14,000 in the heated battle over Delta North last election.

On Feb. 1, Elections BC released candidates’ financing reports for the 2020 provincial election. The records show NDP candidate Ravi Kahlon’s campaign took in $69,167 and spent $57,761. The bulk of the funds came via transfers from party coffers, while a total of $316.66 was received from a pair of individual donations.

Kahlon’s campaign spent $44,386 on advertising — $10,960 for signs, $13,574 for promotional materials, $5,782 for commercial canvassing, a combined $14,070 for newspaper, radio and social media ads, and $500 for website displays — another $4,036 on office rent, utilities, insurance and maintenance, $1,740 on furniture and equipment, and $2,113 on salaries and benefits.

BC Liberal candidate Jet Sunner’s campaign received $44,261 and spent $43,484. All of the campaign funds came via transfers from the party.

Sunner’s campaign spent $17,375 on advertising — $7,845 for signs, $8,443 promotional materials, a combined $1,086 on newspaper and social media ads, and $101 for website displays — another $13,912 on professional services, $6,140 on postage and couriers, $1,790 on telecommunications and information technology, $509 on research and data, and $486 on social functions.

The campaign did not list any spending on salaries and benefits or office rent.

BC Green candidate Neema Manral’s campaign, meanwhile, took in $7,978 and spent $9,864. All of that money came by way of 16 individual donations, plus a refund of the candidate’s $250 nomination deposit.

Manral’s campaign expenses were limited to advertising — $8,114 for signs and $1,500 for social media ads.

Under the Election Act, candidates who receive at least 10 per cent of the valid votes in their electoral district can submit claims to have some of their election expenses reimbursed. Eligible candidates can be reimbursed for up to 50 per cent of their eligible expenses, up to a maximum of 50 per cent of the election expenses limit.

READ MORE: B.C. political parties reap more millions from public subsidy (Feb. 1, 2021)

Kahlon’s campaign was reimbursed $25,307, while Sunner’s campaign was reimbursed $20,567. Manral’s campaign was not eligible.

Kahlon was re-elected with 12,215 votes (56.78 per cent of ballots cast). Sunner came in second (7,179 votes), followed by Manral (2,120 votes). A total of 21,514 ballots were cast in Delta North, almost 57 per cent of registered voters in the riding.

Meanwhile, the BC Liberals vastly outspent both the NDP and Green Party in Delta South, even though polling showed incumbent Ian Paton was unlikely to lose his bid for re-election.

Paton’s campaign took in $89,883 and spent $69,488. Minus $21,403 in election expense reimbursement and a $250 refund of the candidate’s nomination deposit, Paton’s campaign was financed entirely by the party.

Paton’s campaign spent $19,008 on advertising — $4,072 for signs, $6,549 for promotional materials, $922 for commercial canvassing, a combined $7,362 for newspaper and social media ads, and $101 for website displays — another $2,145 on office rent, utilities, insurance and maintenance, $4,999 on postage and couriers, $1,080 on professional services, $1,597 on research and data, and $12,000 on salaries and benefits.

BC NDP candidate Bruce Reid’s campaign took in $5,657 and spent $4,875. All of the campaign’s money came via transfers from the party.

Reid’s campaign spent $1,774 on advertising — $1,599 for signs and $174 on newspaper ads — another $500 on professional services, $227 on telecommunications and information technology, and $2,113 on salaries and benefits.

BC Green candidate Peter van der Velden’s campaign took in $7,908 and spent $3,866. Most of the campaign’s funds came via transfers from the party, with $1,933 in election expense reimbursement and a total of $800 from four individual donations.

van der Velden’s campaign spent $3,722 on advertising — $1,333 for signs and $2,388 on newspaper ads — another $116 on social functions and $28 on telecommunications and information technology. The campaign did not list any expenses relating to salaries and benefits.

All three campaigns were reimbursed for their election expenses. Paton’s campaign received $21,403, while Reid’s campaign received $2,312 and van der Velden’s campaign received $1,933.

Paton was re-elected with 12,828 votes (51.7 per cent of ballots cast). Reid came in second with 8,404 votes, followed by van der Velden with 3,581 votes). A total of 24,813 ballots were cast in Delta South, about 67 per cent of registered voters in the riding.



editor@northdeltareporter.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

BC politicsBC Votes 2020DeltaNorth DeltaSouth Delta