Btk-spraying plane shown in video posted to B.C. government’s Youtube channel.

May 5 date set for plane to spray Surrey area plagued by gypsy moth

Plan is for low-flying aircraft to spray biological insecticide in the early-morning hours

** This story was updated on May 4 at 1:52 p.m.

A plane is scheduled to spray a biological insecticide in Surrey’s Fraser Heights neighbourhood on the morning of Tuesday, May 5, with more to follow on Wednesday (May 6).

The date is announced on a B.C. government website that outlines plans to eradicate gypsy moths from three areas of the province, including a 241-acre area near Port Mann Bridge — north of 108th Avenue to Highway 17 (South Fraser Perimeter Road), west to Highway 1 and east to 162nd Street.

“The majority of the treatment area will be treated between 5:10 a.m. and 7:30 (a.m.) on May 5,” says an advisory. “Considering the flight path and time restrictions in place by Transport Canada and the Pesticide Use Permit, a small area in the center of the treatment block and the western edge of the treatment block will be treated on May 6th from 5:10 am – 6:00 am as they will not be completed on May 5th.”

The area was hand-sprayed in 2017 and 2018, and then aerially sprayed last spring. “It is now apparent that the treatments did not completely eradicate this infestation,” said a news release from the Ministry of Forests in December.

• RELATED STORY, from April 14: Aircraft ready to spray insecticide in area of Surrey where gypsy moths are a problem.

Now, a new round of aerial spraying is ready for takeoff.

The government advisory says planned spray dates are weather-dependent and can change under short notice. The spraying, conducted with a low-flying, fixed-wing plane, will take place in the early-morning hours, usually between 5 a.m. and 8 a.m.

There will be three “treatments” seven to 10 days apart.

“A fourth treatment may be required if one of the first three treatments are not fully completed due to weather or mechanical delays,” the website notes. “Foray 48B, a biological insecticide containing Btk as the active ingredient, will be applied. Btk occurs naturally in soil and is commonly used in organic agriculture.

“To avoid contact with the product (Foray 48B) stay indoors and keep your doors and windows closed during the spray treatment and for up to one hour after spraying is complete.”

Those with questions about the spraying are directed to the website gov.bc.ca/gypsymoth and the toll-free phone number 1-866-917-5999.

(Story continues below video about the 2017 gypsy moth spray program for Saanich)

• READ MORE: Aerial gypsy moth sprayings planned for Surrey in 2020.

Trapping and monitoring results over the past several years, according to the December news release, show “clear evidence” that gypsy moth populations are becoming established in parts of North Surrey, Lake Cowichan and Castlegar. “If left untreated, the invasive moth could spread to new areas of the province via vehicles, containers, rail and marine vessels.”

The ministry says gypsy moths are an introduced pest species, and the caterpillars feed on tree leaves and can damage forests, farms and orchards. In recent years, large gypsy moth populations have defoliated sections of forests and residential areas in Ontario and the U.S.

The moths are unintentionally brought to B.C. on vehicles and equipment from eastern North America, the ministry says.

The B.C. government website says Surrey and Delta residents can help prevent the gypsy moth from establishing permanently “by inspecting your outdoor plant waste for egg masses and ensuring all green waste goes in your green bin.

“If you are a resident of Surrey and have large green waste items that do not fit inside your green waste bin, call the City of Surrey Waste Collection Hotline at 604-590-7289,” the website says.



tom.zillich@surreynowleader.com

Like us on Facebook Follow us on Instagram and follow Tom on Twitter

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Charges laid in 2019 single-vehicle crash in Surrey that killed young soccer star

Dilpreet Sandhu, 19, faces eight charges in early morning crash that killed Brandon Bassi

Surrey pushing the poor out of Whalley, public hearing speakers say

‘There is a war on the poor here in Surrey,’ resident Dave Diewert tells city council

IHIT investigating death of Surrey woman

Injured woman was taken to SMH early Tuesday morning

Surrey seniors call Seniors’ Centre Without Walls, a new-to-B.C. program

‘Crazy coincidence’ saw program connect soon after COVID-19 pandemic hit

Surrey Mounties seize guns, drugs and cash from Guildford residence

One man was arrested but no charges have been laid as investigation continues

If Trudeau won’t stand up to Trump, how will regular people: Singh

Trudeau did not directly answer a question about Trump’s actions amid protests

VIDEO: Internal investigation into aggressive arrest by Kelowna Mountie

A video allegedly shows a Kelowna Mountie striking a man several times

COVID claims 23rd Langley Lodge patient, making it the deadliest outbreak in B.C.

Coronavirus kills another senior at Langley care home, bringing B.C. total to 166

Family of dead B.C. football star urge changes to mental health policies in hospitals

Uko family disappointed in actions of Regina hospital, hosting public funeral service this weekend

Facing changes together: Your community, your journalists

Importance of accurate, ethical reporting more critical than ever

22 new COVID-19 test-positives, one death following days of low case counts in B.C.

Health officials urged British Columbians to ‘stand together while staying apart’

John Horgan says COVID-19 restrictions won’t be eased regionally

B.C. Liberals urge ‘tailored’ response based on infections

Feds get failing grade for lack of action plan on anniversary of MMIWG report

‘Instead of a National Action Plan, we have been left with a Lack-of-Action Plan’

Maple Ridge woman fights WorkSafe BC over police widow’s pension

Dalila Vroom says husband, Const. Rob Vroom, died as a result of PTSD from time with Abbotsford PD

Most Read