A crash at 88th Avenue and King George Boulevard last summer. This intersection is identified by the province as the highest crash location in Surrey, and is one of almost 30 intersections in the city that now have 24/7 cameras running. (Photo: DriveBC)

A crash at 88th Avenue and King George Boulevard last summer. This intersection is identified by the province as the highest crash location in Surrey, and is one of almost 30 intersections in the city that now have 24/7 cameras running. (Photo: DriveBC)

MAP: 29 Surrey ‘high-crash’ intersection cameras now live around the clock

Aiming to reduce crashes and save lives, provincial government increases operation of 140 cameras to 24 hours a day

SURREY — Your chances of getting a red-light ticket in the mail just went up.

In an effort to reduce death and serious injuries on B.C. roads, the provincial government announced Tuesday that its 140 “high-crash” intersection cameras will now operate 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

The upgrade began last fall, as the B.C. government struggles with accident and injury claims that have pushed ICBC rates up in recent years.

The cameras had previously been activated for six hours a day during high traffic times.

In Surrey — where an average of 20 people die on city roads each year — 29 intersections are included in the province’s 140 “high-crash” locales, mostly in the city’s north end.

“Last year we saw a record 350,000 crashes in B.C., with about 60 per cent of them happening at intersections,” said B.C. Public Safety Minister Mike Farnworth in a release. “The full activation of these cameras is overdue and an important step for safety on some of our busiest roadways.”

Red-light camera tickets are handed out when a vehicle enters an intersection after the signal light turns red. The vehicle’s registered owner is responsible for the ticket even if they are not driving, but does not receive penalty points on their licence.

More safety upgrades are expected via these cameras, later this year.

In March the provincial government announced plans to add technology at certain “Intersection Safety Camera” locations to ticket the fastest drivers passing through those intersections on red, yellow or green lights.

“Analysis of crash and speed data is ongoing to determine which locations will receive this technology,” a government press release notes. “New signs will warn approaching drivers about the enhanced intersection enforcement. The number and locations of the speed-activated cameras will be announced in fall 2018.”

The province says an average of more than 11,000 crashes occur at the 140 high-crash intersections each year.

Surrey intersections with 24/7 cameras:

  • King George Boulevard and 128th Street (Average of 100 crashes and 45 injuries per year)
  • King George Boulevard and 108th Avenue (Average of 64 crashes and 26 injuries per year)
  • Scott Road and 96th Avenue (Average of 73 crashes and 34 injuries per year)
  • 120th Street and 72nd Avenue (Average of 128 crashes and 51 injuries per year)
  • 72nd Avenue and 128th Street (Average of 82 crashes and 39 injuries per year)
  • 128th Street and 88th Avenue (Average of 103 crashes and 45 injuries per year)
  • 96th Avenue and 128th Street (Average of 72 crashes and 34 injuries per year)
  • 72nd Avenue and King George Boulevard (Average of 160 crashes and 72 injuries per year)
  • King George Boulevard and 76th Avenue (Average of 103 crashes and 51 injuries per year)
  • 96th Avenue and 132nd Street (Average of 33 crashes and 19 injuries per year)
  • 88th Avenue and 132nd Street (Average of 55 crashes and 26 injuries per year)
  • King George Boulevard and 104th Avenue (Average of 98 crashes and 40 injuries per year)
  • 96th Avenue and King George Boulevard (Average of 113 crashes and 52 injuries per year)
  • King George Boulevard and 92nd Avenue (Average of 34 crashes and 20 injuries per year)
  • 88th Avenue and King George Boulevard (Average of 188 crashes and 90 injuries per year)
  • King George Boulevard and 80th Avenue (Average of 78 crashes and 41 injuries per year)
  • 64th Avenue and King George Boulevard (Average of 126 crashes and 62 injuries per year)
  • Fraser Highway and 96th Avenue (Average of 94 crashes and 49 injuries per year)
  • 88th Avenue and 140th Street (Average of 70 crashes and 37 injuries per year)
  • 104th Avenue and 152nd Street (Average of 118 crashes and 43 injuries per year)
  • 100th Avenue and 152nd Street (Average of 63 crashes and 31 injuries per year)
  • 152nd Street and 96th Avenue (Average of 74 crashes and 38 injuries per year)
  • 152nd Street and Fraser Highway (Average of 112 crashes and 52 injuries per year)
  • 152nd Street and 88th Avenue (Average of 74 crashes and 37 injuries per year)
  • 88th Avenue and Fraser Highway (Average of 72 crashes and 35 injuries per year)
  • 64th Avenue and 152nd Street (Average of 90 crashes and 42 injuries per year)
  • 152nd Street and Highway 10 (Average of 134 crashes and 53 injuries per year)
  • 64th Avenue and 176th Street (Average of 94 crashes and 43 injuries per year)
  • 152nd Street at King George Boulevard (Average of 82 crashes and 36 injuries per year)

—based on 2014 ICBC data (2009 to 2013 crashes)

With files from Tom Fletcher

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