Surrey is trying to put an end to costly dumping in this city by offering free drop off.

Free junk drop off in Surrey

City works to slow skyrocketing costs of illegal dumping in Surrey

Surrey has launched a free drop off site for large household waste, in an effort to cut huge clean up costs in this city.

Last year, Surrey taxpayers spent almost $1 million in cleaning up after illegal dumpers, almost double what it cost a decade before.

Surrey has launched several programs to stop the financial bleed, including enforcement, but costs keep climbing.

“A major contributing factor leading to illegal dumping is the high cost of disposal fees at regional transfer stations, combined with the lack of convenience relating to the location of these facilities,” Surrey’s General Manager of Engineering wrote in a report to council.

In July, Surrey started “Pop-up Junk Drop” events at the city’s works yard, at 6651 148 St.

Three events have been held so far, and are being described as extremely successful.

The events “were met with highly positive feedback from participating residents,” Smith wrote.

At the first two events, Surrey collected 260 metric tonnes of waste, 185 tonnes of which was recycled, and another 30 tonnes was of use to the Salvation Army.

It equates to a 71 per cent diversion from the landfill, which is on par with regional targets.

The junk drop off events will take, furniture and mattresses, electronics and household items, appliances and scrap metal, tires, paper, cardboard and styrofoam, household renovation waste, mixed plastics and reusable items for donation.

Commercial waste, or commercial vehicles will not be allowed, nor will hazardous or dangerous waste, animal waste or carcasses, car parts, lead-acid batteries, dirt, rocks, sand, drywall or concrete.

City staff say the cost of the pop-up junk events is about $180,000 for the four months.

The city couldn’t say yet whether the calls for illegal dumping have dropped or not.

That said, because of the promising turnout, it’s quite possible the service will continue past the trial period.

A staff report will be going to Surrey council after the conclusion of the pop-up event in October.

The coming events will be held from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the city’s works yard on Aug. 27, Sept. 17 and Oct. 1.

Picture ID is required as proof the driver is from Surrey. No vehicles larger than one-ton trucks will be admitted.

For more information, visit http://www.surrey.ca/culture-recreation/20196.aspx

 

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