An artist’s rendering of the five-storey women and children’s transitional housing facility in Whalley. Surrey council will be voting on the development permit at the March 11 council meeting. (Image: City of Surrey)

FIRST LOOK: Surrey council OKs women’s transition housing proposal

Project would have 85 housing units as well as medical, dental offices on ground floor

Surrey council approved a development permit and a development variance permit Monday (March 11) for the five-storey transitional housing building near Surrey Memorial Hospital.

The project, which was submitted by the Elizabeth Fry Society of Greater Vancouver, would have 85 units, according to the March 11 council agenda.

On the second floor there would be 28 units, which wouldn’t include kitchens or bathrooms, “as residents must uiltize the common kitchen and shared bathrooms.” The 57 units on levels three to five would be complete dwelling units with kitchens and bathrooms for longer-term stays.

The ground floor, according to the agenda, would have space for medical and dental officers, as well as amenity space and programming space and offices for the non-profit.

It was in December of 2014 that council gave third reading to rezone three properties for a transitional housing facility. Since then, the Elizabeth Fry Society of Greater Vancouver submitted a development permit application.

The society, according to the March 11 city council agenda, is a non-profit organization, currently operating in New Westminster, “focused on delivering support for low-income and marginalized women and children at risk.”

The agenda says the society requires financial support and partnerships, and the proposed transitional housing facility is supported by the Fraser Valley Aboriginal Friendship Centres Association, BC Housing and the City of Surrey.

The Elizabeth Fry Society of Greater Vancouver, according to its website, has a goal “to support criminalized and marginalized women, girls and children in achieving their potentional.”

The society began in 1939, and its early work focused on “transforming conditions for women and girls in custody.”

It now serves more than 2,200 clients annually. Of the clients, 77 per cent have children, “and the majority of these are the sole caregiver. Virtually all live below the poverty line.”

Elizabeth Fry has programs for at-risk women and at-risk women with children and families.

For more info on the society, visit elizabethfry.com.

READ ALSO: Green Timbers transitional housing project OK’d, but without shelter beds, Dec. 6, 2018

READ ALSO: Surrey councillor expects 200 more units for homeless to be ‘all over city, Feb. 27, 2019



lauren.collins@surreynowleader.com

Like us on Facebook Follow us on Instagram and follow Lauren on Twitter

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Surrey RCMP looking for ‘distraction theft’ suspect

Suspect allegedly tried to swipe a man’s necklace while giving him a hug

White Rock brewery turns up the (alcohol by) volume in COVID-19 fight

3 Dogs Brewing is making hand sanitizer for frontline workers, general public

Cloverdale automobile shop offers to pick up, service, and drop off vehicles

Surrey’s Visscher-Pau Automotive starts ‘Blue Glove’ valet service — will cover Cloverdale, Langley, Newton, Fleetwood, and Hazelmere

1,000 food hampers packed for delivery to students of Surrey’s inner-city schools

City Dream Centre-led initiative involved volunteer effort at Horizon Church in Newton

Surrey councillor wants property taxes deferred to December

Linda Annis is expected to present notice of motion to that effect at April 6 “virtual” council meeting

Here’s how to talk to people who aren’t taking physical distancing seriously

Approach the conversation with empathy says conflict expert

B.C. clears more acute hospital beds as COVID-19 case growth slows

Province holding about 40% of beds empty for peak still to come

As 500K+ apply for emergency benefit, Trudeau says aid coming for Canadians left behind

Canada Emergency Response Benefit provides $2,000 per month

Wearing non-medical masks can stop spread of COVID-19 before symptoms start: Tam

Health officials had previously not recommended wearing them

UPDATE: UK PM Boris Johnson moved to intensive care after COVID-19 symptoms worse

He has been quarantined in his Downing St. residence since being diagnosed with COVID-19 on March 26

Travellers, travel agents ‘in agony’ over refund policies and customer service

Many Canadian carriers are offering customers flights rebookings or travel vouchers — but not refunds

Introverted and extroverted kids likely to react differently to COVID-19 restrictions

B.C. child psychologist says your parenting approach can’t be one-size fits all in social isolation

B.C. begins taking submissions for $2M COVID-19 research fund

Rural health, impact of shifting hospital resources among priorities

Most Read