Delta Foundation logo. (Delta Foundation image)

Delta Foundation logo. (Delta Foundation image)

Emergency funding granted to eight Delta charities

The Delta Foundation handed out a total of $181,860 through Canada’s Emergency Community Support Fund

Eight Delta charities supporting vulnerable populations have received a total of $181,860 in funding from the Delta Foundation through the Government of Canada’s Emergency Community Support Fund (ECSF).

According to Delta Foundation press release, a survey conducted in April found that 80 per cent of charities in Canada were operating with decreased capacity due to the economic downturn caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, and nearly one in five organizations had suspended or ceased their operations. The projected financial losses for registered charities in Canada is between $9.5-15.7 billion and $15.7 billion.

The federal government launched the ECSF on May 19, and the Delta Foundation is one of 177 community foundations across the country participating in the program. Through the ECSF, the foundation is providing emergency support for charities throughout Delta in partnership with Community Foundations of Canada and the Government of Canada.

RELATED: Feds unveil $350M fund to help charities, non-profits get through pandemic

“Since the start of the pandemic, charities and non-profit organizations have been leading the charge to assist those who need it most in the fight against COVID-19,” Delta Foundation president Peter Roaf said in a press release. “We know the need for funding is still significant. Delta Foundation has granted the full funding available to our community through the ECSF. There are other charities supporting vulnerable populations and we would have been glad to support them, but, unfortunately, we can’t accept any more applications.”

More than 15 charities applied for ECSF support through the Delta Foundation for various worthy causes, but, in the rapid response and rolling approval process, the following eight charities serving Delta were allocated funding:

• Big Sisters of BC Lower Mainland: $5055 for its Study Buddy program, which provides weekly no-cost tutoring and mentoring focused on school work and study skills to at-risk youth aged 7-17 from low income families.

• Deltassist Family and Community Services Society: $70,000 for the temporary North Delta Food Bank, which serves 708 people in North Delta every two weeks who, because of the COVID-19 pandemic, are experiencing homelessness, job loss, or ongoing financial struggles and no access to local food banks which have been closed temporarily.

• Little House Alcohol and Drug Addiction Recovery Society: $10,000 for the Heart of the Youth program, which provides youth affected by substance use disorder a safe, non-judgmental online space to share their thoughts and feelings, begin to heal and develop a supportive community.

• Mamas for Mamas — Metro Vancouver: $30,000 for the Respond Like a Mother program, which helps low income mothers access the basics such as food, hygiene, housing and other essential needs.

• Options Community Services: $8,000 for the Ready to Work (R2W) program, which aims to reduce barriers to finding post-COVID employment by increasing employability among clients experiencing mental illness.

• Reach Child and Youth Development Society: $25,805 for the Virtual Autism Early Intervention Therapies program, which helps ensure that children continue to receive the support programs and services they need to reach their potential, and that families receive the tools, materials, equipment and guidance necessary to support their child’s continued development from home where in-person services are not feasible.

• Surrey-North Delta Meals on Wheels: $15,000 for the Subsidized Meals During COVID-19 Pandemic program, which helps those in the community experiencing food and financial security issues and are housebound — either due to the restrictions placed on them by the COVID-19 virus or loss of employment, are immune-compromised individuals or families, or seniors who are ordinarily not able to afford the organization’s meals.

•WINGS Fellowship Ministries: $18,000 for the COVID-19 Mental Health and Well Being Project, which provides self-help tools to support mental well-being along with a way to reduce clients’ contact with other people by providing them a grocery gift card and a way to transport their groceries.

Charities that would like to be notified if additional ECSF funding becomes available can fill out an online form here.

Charities can also explore opportunities with other ECSF funding intermediaries in the community, such as United Way Centraide Canada and Canadian Red Cross. More information about these national funders is available at canada.ca/en/services/benefits/emergency-community-support-fund.



editor@northdeltareporter.com

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