Children and Family Development Minister Katrine Conroy (BC Government/Flickr)

Early learning programs for Indigenous kids get $30M boost

B.C. government to help expand Aboriginal Head Start Association programs with three-year funding

The B.C. government is boosting social services for Indigenous children by expanding programs offered by the non-profit Aboriginal Head Start Association.

“Having no-fee childcare will provide great opportunities for hundreds of families who have been frustrated by lack of money to make changes for themselves,” said association president Leila Aubichon on Thursday. “Parents can further their education and get jobs, confident that their children are getting excellent care.”

The money will help up to 320 families, the association believes, including children in its 12 existing schools, including in Prince Rupert, Comox Valley and Mission, who have been on long wait lists.

The association has run programs across Canada since 1995, with the mandate to provide early learning and care experiences for First Nations, Métis and Inuit children and their families living in urban settings.

A third of the $30 million is earmarked for the First Nations Health Authority’s existing programs as well as to create new early-learning spaces in First Nations communities.

Another portion, about $6.5 million per year for the next three years, will set up Head Start preschools in underserved communities, as well as expand programs that already exist in 12 cities, Aboriginal Head Start Association said Thursday.

The cash falls under the $153-million, three-year Early Learning and Child Care partnership between B.C. and federal government.


@ashwadhwani
ashley.wadhwani@bpdigital.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Surrey sisters have been missing for two weeks

‘Both police and family are concerned for these youths’ health and well-being’

Dispatch Delta firefighters to more medical calls: Jackson

Change in provincial protocol last year resulted in Delta Fire being sent to 836 fewer incidents

North Delta crime beat, week of Nov. 11

A selection of property crimes submitted weekly by the Delta Police Department

VIDEO: ‘Climate emergency’ is Oxford’s 2019 Word of the Year

Other words on the shortlist included ‘extinction,’ ‘climate denial’ and ‘eco-anxiety’

Canucks erupt with 5 power-play goals in win over Nashville

Vancouver ends three-game slide with 6-3 triumph over Predators

65-million-year-old triceratops makes its debut in Victoria

Dino Lab Inc. is excavating the fossilized remains of a 65-million-year-old dinosaur

B.C. widow suing health authority after ‘untreatable’ superbug killed her husband

New Public Agency Health report puts Canadian death toll at 5,400 in 2018

Changes to B.C. building code address secondary suites, energy efficiency

Housing Minister Selina Robinson says the changes will help create more affordable housing

Trudeau appears open to safer-opioid proposal in Vancouver: mayor

The city has applied for $6 million from Health Canada to allow for the safe distribution of diamorphine

Security guard at Kamloops music festival gets three years for sexually assaulting concertgoer

Shawn Christopher Gray walked the woman home after she became seperated from her friends, court heard

Most Read