Delta Museum seeks input for exhibits at new facility

On Nov. 5, the George Mackie Library is hosting an event to get feedback from North Deltans about Delta museum's focus and exhibits.

Photograph of Annieville Cannery in North Delta on the Fraser River

The Delta Museum is asking for the public’s help planning its new facility.

On Saturday, Nov. 5, the museum is hosting an exhibit, “Reflecting Delta,” at the George Mackie Library to get feedback from North Deltans about the museum’s themes and messages, as well as what people would like to see and learn about when its new home opens sometime in 2018.

The Delta Museum is currently closed while its previous home, a 1912 Tudor-style heritage building in the heart of Ladner that served as Delta’s original municipal hall, undergoes significant renovations and structural work that began earlier this year.

Once renovations are complete, the building at 4858 Delta St. will be used as a CoPS community policing station. It is expected to reopen in late 2017/early 2018.

Meanwhile, the museum will be permanently relocated to a new site adjacent to the Delta Archives at 4450 Clarence Taylor Cres.

The new museum will be based on a new delivery model focused on community outreach and engagement through programs at schools and in the community.

After successful outings in South Delta, the museum is bringing the exhibit to North Delta in order to ensure that all three communities are well served and represented by the new facility.

“A museum should reflect the values of the community it represents. While we are pretty familiar with some of the choices of long-time residents in Ladner and Tsawwassen, these communities have changed over time, and we need to open the door for new thoughts and ways of expressing the history of the community,” said museum curator Darryl MacKenzie.

“We have a great opportunity to evaluate what we have done in the past, and how we can have the greatest impact on all of Delta in the future.”

MacKenzie said the museum is especially interested in hearing from residents of North Delta.

“We really want the input from North Delta because the history is different and the community has a whole different dynamic than South Delta. How the North is represented is going to be a major focus of museum development from now on.”

Reflecting Delta is comprised of three interactive activities designed to get feedback from visitors.

The first asks them to choose up to five items out of 12 that they believe preservation money ought to be spent on.

The second activity looks at what items or events best represent what Delta means for participants. Of the pictures and items for this task, visitors are asked to give those things they feel most closely represent Delta a happy face emoji, while those they feel in no way represent Delta get a frowning emoji.

The third activity focuses on the people themselves by giving visitors 40 cards and asking them to choose 10 that best represent who they are as individuals.

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