Delta council votes to allow gas fire pits, heaters; empower police to enforce fire bylaw

Enforcing the bylaw, including responding to fireworks complaints, previously fell to Delta Fire

(Contributed photo)

(Contributed photo)

Delta is updating its fire regulation bylaw to allow the use of natural gas and propane fueled outdoor heating elements, and to empower Delta Police and bylaw officers to issue tickets under the bylaw.

On Monday, city council voted to add heating appliances such as gas fire pits, fire tables, fire places and umbrella-style heaters to the list of apparatus exempt from the fire regulation bylaw, which includes charcoal, natural gas or propane barbecues, grills or other outdoor appliances for the sole purpose of cooking food.

A report to council by Delta Fire Chief Guy McKintuck notes that while gas fire pits and the like are currently prohibited, the ban is not enforced, creating confusion in the community regarding what is allowed. The change to allow the appliances would align the bylaw with current practices and enforcement approaches.

City manager Sean McGill said the original ban was meant to address wood-burning chimineas and other similar appliances — as well as open fire pits in people’s backyards, added Mayor George Harvie — that presented a fire hazard in the community.

“That’s what people were using around that time, they wern’t using as much the natural gas ones,” McGill told council Monday. “The intent was never to capture the CSA-approved natural gas-burning fire tables, but they got caught up [with] these outdoor [wood] burning appliances.”

Meanwhile, council also voted to give city bylaw enforcement officers and Delta police the authority to issue tickets and bylaw notices under the fire regulation bylaw.

Previously, authority to issue tickets under the bylaw rested solely with Delta Fire a& Emergency Services, which the report notes “has created challenges with the timely enforcement of offences, particularly related to the use of fireworks in the community.”

“Moving forward, giving bylaw enforcement officers and police officers the clear authority to issue tickets and bylaw notices under this bylaw will help provide for more effective enforcement.”

The move also made it an offence under the bylaw to not provide police or bylaw officers with a correct name and address when asked, or to otherwise obstruct enforcement of the bylaw. The new rules are both punishable by a $250 fine.

Under the bylaw, it is an offence to light any fire in any highway allowance, street, lane, square, park or other public place within the municipality, except as so authorized by the fire chief. It is also an offence to discard, throw down or drop any lighted match, cigar, cigarette or other burning substance into — or in close proximity to — combustible material. Both offences come with a $200 fine.

It is also illegal to possess or transport fireworks in Delta at any time without a permit — punishable by a $200 fine — and selling, giving or trading fireworks within the municipality is banned year-round — punishable by a $250 fine. Breaching the conditions of a fireworks possession permit is also a $250 fine.



editor@northdeltareporter.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Delta

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

President of the West Coast Fine Arts Show, Brian Croft, said pandemic restrictions necessitated a shift to an entirely online event this year, running until April 30. (File photo)
The West Fine Art Show shifts to an online-only event amid tighter health orders

Website version retains the flavour of the annual live exhibition

A vaccine-filled needle awaits injection, during a COVID-19 vaccination clinic held Jan. 15, 2021 at Amica White Rock. Community Living B.C.-funded workers learned April 8 that they, too, can now be vaccinated. (Tracy Holmes file photo)
Support workers for those with disabilities given vaccine priority

News shared with Community Living B.C.-funded staff on April 8

British Columbia Attorney General David Eby. (Photo: THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck)
Attorney General covers housing, homelessness and justice reform in Surrey Zoom

‘I think it would be really great to hold some sessions in Surrey,’ Eby says of legislative assembly

Scott Wheatley stands with the main Kenyan and Ugandan umpiring crew that he trained at the Nakirebe Complex outside of Kampala in 2020. Wheatley, a member-at-large with Softball B.C. is supporting a recent open letter from the sporting body that calls on the government to reinstate gameplay for kids in organized sports. (Photo: Submitted)
Softball B.C. urges provincial health officer to lift ban on gameplay for kids in organized sports

Sporting body sent open letter to both Bonnie Henry and Adrian Dix

Surrey Fire Service is on scene of a fire in the 12300-block of 72A Avenue Saturday morning (April 10). (Photo: Shane MacKichan)
Surrey crews on scene of house fire

It happened in the 12300-block of 72A Avenue

B.C. Health Minister Adrian Dix and Premier John Horgan describe vaccine rollout at the legislature, March 29, 2021. (B.C. government)
1,262 more COVID-19 infections in B.C. Friday, 9,574 active cases

Province’s mass vaccination reaches one million people

The 10-part Netflix series Maid, which is being exclusively shot in Greater Victoria, was filming near Prospect Lake in Saanich last month. (Photo courtesy Fred Haynes)
Province announces $150,000 towards South Island film studio, fulfilling B.C. NDP promise

Investment to fund movie studio feasibility study at Camosun College

Tyson Ginter, 7, is proud of his latest Hot Wheels he recently received by Quesnel RCMP Const. Matt Joyce. (Photo submitted)
B.C. Mountie handing out toy cars to light up children’s faces

‘A lot of times it will be the only interaction they have with the police,’ says Const. Matt Joyce

People stroll through rows of tulips in bloom during the Tulips of the Valley Festival on May 2, 2017. The colourful spring event, now called Chilliwack Tulips, opens on Sunday, April 11, 2021. (Jenna Hauck/ Chilliwack Progress file)
Fraser Valley tulip attraction returns this weekend for 1 month

More than 6.5 million bulbs in all at this year’s colourful Chilliwack Tulips event

Chief Public Health Officer Theresa Tam speaks during a technical briefing on the COVID pandemic in Canada, Friday, January 15, 2021 in Ottawa. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
Canada’s ICUs see near-record of COVID-19 patients last week as variant cases double

Last week, Canadian hospitals treated an average of 2,500 patients with COVID-19, daily, up 7% from the previous week

University of Victoria rowing coach Barney Williams at the University of Victoria in Victoria, B.C. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito
UVic, women’s rowing coach deny former athlete’s allegation of verbal abuse

Lily Copeland alleges coach Barney Williams would stand close to her and speak aggressively in the sauna

Librarian Katie Burns with the Fraser Valley Regional Libraries poses for a photo in Chilliwack on June 18, 2019. Monday, April 12, 2021 is Library Workers’ Day. (Jenna Hauck/ Chilliwack Progress file)
Unofficial holidays: Here’s what people are celebrating for the week of April 11 to 17

Library Workers Day, That Sucks! Day, and Wear Your Pyjamas to Work Day are all coming up this week

Robinson Russ, 37, was fatally stabbed on April 4, according to a statement from police. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
Vancouver police name victim following city’s fourth homicide of 2021

Robinson Russ, 37, was fatally stabbed Sunday in the Downtown Eastside

Most Read