Scales of justice

Scales of justice

Case of teacher secretly filming teens reaches top court

Acquittal of teacher, Ryan Jarvis, who secretly videoed teens ‘dangerous,’ top court told

Canada’s top court is set to hear the case on Friday of a high school teacher acquitted of voyeurism even though he used a pen camera to secretly record video of the chest area of his female students.

The case raised eyebrows when the trial judge decided Ryan Jarvis, of London, Ont., had violated the teens’ privacy but had no sexual intent in doing so.

The Ontario Court of Appeal — in a split decision — disagreed with the judge on both key points, but nevertheless upheld the acquittal. While Jarvis was surely sexually motivated, the Appeal Court said, the students had no reasonable expectation of privacy at school where the filming occurred.

In its appeal to the Supreme Court of Canada, the prosecution maintains the Appeal Court’s view of privacy was far too narrow.

“The students had a reasonable expectation that they were in circumstances where their privacy interests related to their sexual integrity would be protected,” the government says in its written filing. “Here the impact of the recording on the students’ dignity and sexual integrity was significant.”

Jarvis, however, maintains the students were in classrooms or other common areas where anyone could observe them. Concluding they had a reasonable privacy expectation, he says, could see the criminalization of a wide range of conduct, such as staring at someone from behind tinted sunglasses.

“Reasonable people can debate whether all surreptitious recording of people for a sexual purpose should be made a criminal offence,” Jarvis says. “(But) the court should be very hesitant to expand the concept of ‘reasonable expectation of privacy’…lest it disturb the delicate balance the courts have attempted to strike between the interests of the state and the individual.”

Police charged the English teacher with voyeurism for recordings he made in 2010 and 2011 as he chatted with 27 female students aged 14 to 18. The offence requires two key elements: the accused must be sexually motivated and the target must have a reasonable expectation of privacy.

In November 2015, Superior Court Justice Andrew Goodman decried the teacher’s behaviour as “morally repugnant and professionally objectionable.” Goodman found the students did have a reasonable expectation of privacy but, in a strange twist, acquitted Jarvis on the basis he had no sexual purpose.

“While a conclusion that the accused was photographing the students’ cleavage for a sexual purpose is most likely,” Goodman found, “There may be other inferences.”

The Crown argued on appeal that sexual motivation was a no-brainer: The subjects were young females and Jarvis had deliberately pointed his camera at their breasts.

The majority on the Appeal Court agreed. However, in upholding the acquittal in October, justices Kathryn Feldman and David Watt decided the teens had no reasonable expectation of privacy.

“If a person is in a public place, fully clothed and not engaged in toileting or sexual activity, they will normally not be in circumstances that give rise to a reasonable expectation of privacy,” the justices said.

Justice Grant Huscroft dissented, writing that the privacy interests of the students outweighed the interests of those who would compromise their personal and sexual integrity at school.

“Privacy expectations need not be understood in an all-or-nothing fashion,” Huscroft said, drawing on an example of a mother breast-feeding in public. “There is a reasonable expectation that she will not be visually recorded surreptitiously for a sexual purpose.”

In its appeal to the Supreme Court, the prosecution seized on Huscroft’s dissenting opinion.

“The majority was so focused on a conception of reasonable expectation of privacy based on the ability to exclude others from a location, they failed to appreciate that the trust relationship, along with a school board policy, was a significant factor which gave rise to a reasonable expectation of privacy,” the government argues.

The Samuelson-Glushko Canadian Internet Policy and Public Interest Clinic, one of eight interveners in the case, urged the Supreme Court to convict Jarvis.

“The Ontario Court of Appeal’s majority decision in this case sets a dangerous precedent in terms of the privacy, bodily and sexual integrity, and equality of young Canadians in schools, with especially disturbing implications for girls and young women,” the foundation says.

The Ontario College of Teachers suspended Jarvis in 2013 for failing to pay his dues. He still faces a professional misconduct hearing.

Colin Perkel, The Canadian Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

(pixabay.com photo)
Scavenger hunt to promote family literacy in Delta

Delta Kids is holding the free month-long event to celebrate Family Literacy Day on Jan. 27

B.C. Supreme Court in Vancouver. (File photo: Tom Zytaruk)
Surrey, Langley twin brothers who own companies together battle in court

Presiding judge described Surrey resident Kerry Hawley and Langley resident Kelly Petersen as ‘self-made successes’

Protestors at the Cloverdale Fairgrounds show their support for farmers in India Dec. 5, 2020. Hundreds gathered at the fairgrounds before driving in a convoy to the Indian consulate in Vancouver to protest three new laws they say will negatively impact farmers in India. (Photo: Jason Sveinson)
Protest in support of Indian farmers planned for Cloverdale

Surrey Challo event described as ‘a cultural awakening & lively protest’

16500-block of 24 Avenue. (Google image)
Council pushes forward applications for 400-plus dwellings in South Surrey

Loss of trees, pressure on schools cited by public, council members as areas of concern

The Anti-Racist Coalition Vancouver started a petition calling on B.C.’s education officials to make Black Shirt Day official. The inaugural event in solidarity with Black and racialized Canadians takes place on Friday, Jan. 15. (Screenshot/Change.org)
Surrey students, staff to take part in first-ever Black Shirt Day

Special day in ‘recognition of the struggle for civil rights fought by Black and racialized Canadians’

A woman wears a face mask and shield to curb the spread of COVID-19 while walking in North Vancouver, B.C., on Wednesday, January 6, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
536 COVID cases, 7 deaths reported as B.C. find its first case of South African variant

Henry said 69,746 people have received their first dose of the COVID vaccine.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau listens to a question during a news conference outside Rideau cottage in Ottawa, Friday, January 8, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
Trudeau says Canada’s COVID vaccine plan on track despite Pfizer cutting back deliveries

Canadian officials says it will still likely receive four million doses by the end of March

Alan Davidson was sentenced to almost six years for abusing seven boys in the late 1970s and early 1990s. (Canadian Press file)
Full parole granted to former Mountie, sports coach convicted of sex abuse of boys

Alan Davidson convicted of abusing boys in B.C. and Saskatchewan in late ’70s, early ’90s

Letisha Reimer died Nov. 1, 2016 after being stabbed at Abbotsford Senior Secondary.
No evidence that killer was in ‘psychotic state’ during Abbotsford school stabbing: Crown

Second day of closing arguments at ‘not criminally responsible’ hearing for Gabriel Klein

The first COVID-19 vaccine arrives in B.C. in temperature-controlled containers, Dec. 13, 2020. (B.C. government)
More vaccine arrives as B.C. struggles with remote COVID-19 cases

Long-term care homes remain focus for public health

The first Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine dose in Canada is prepared at The Michener Institute in Toronto on Monday, Dec. 14, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn
Doses of COVID-19 vaccine expected in 60 B.C. First Nations by next week

B.C. has allocated 25,000 doses of COVID-19 vaccine to First Nations for distribution by the end of February

Kamloops-South Thompson MLA Todd Stone questions the NDP government in the B.C. legislature, Feb. 25, 2020. (Hansard TV)
Todd Stone says he’s not running for B.C. Liberal leadership

Kamloops MLA was widely viewed as a front-runner

Wireless voice and data services are out for those on Telus as of Thursday (Jan. 14) afternoon across Western Canada, Telus Support said in a recent Tweet. (Black Press file photo)
UPDATE: Telus services restored across Western Canada

Telus said they are monitoring the situation to ensure connections remain stable

Most Read