An Air Canada jet takes off from Halifax Stanfield International Airport in Enfield, N.S. on Thursday, March 8, 2012. Canadian airlines must now offer more compensation to passengers for inconveniences. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Andrew Vaughan)

An Air Canada jet takes off from Halifax Stanfield International Airport in Enfield, N.S. on Thursday, March 8, 2012. Canadian airlines must now offer more compensation to passengers for inconveniences. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Andrew Vaughan)

Canadian airline passengers to be eligible for $1,000 in compensation for delayed flights

Passengers can also receive compensation for overbooking, lost luggage and other inconveniences

  • Dec. 12, 2019 12:58 p.m.

Airline travellers can look forward to some better rights, and just in time for the holiday season.

The second phase of the new Air Passenger Protection Regulations from the Canadian Transportation Agency is coming into effect on Dec. 15.

Passengers will then be eligible for up to $1,000 in compensation for flight delays and cancellations within an airline’s control that are not safety-related.

ALSO READ: Transport watchdog fines four airlines $45,000 under new passenger bill of rights

“The Air Passenger Protection Regulations establish a clear, consistent set of minimum airline obligations towards passengers if, for example, their flight is delayed or cancelled, they’re bumped from an overbooked flight, they sit on a plane during a tarmac delay, or their bag is lost or damaged,” said Scott Streiner, the agency’s chair and CEO.

“Thousands of Canadians participated in the consultations that helped shape these new rules. We’re grateful for their input and confident that these groundbreaking regulations will help ensure passengers are treated fairly if their air travel doesn’t go smoothly.”

ALSO READ: Air Canada forced girl, 12, to remove hijab

Airlines will also be responsible for re-booking or refunding passengers when flights are delayed, including using a competing airline. During such a delay, airlines are to provide food, drink and accommodations, and must allow children aged 14 and under to sit near an accompanying adult at no extra charge.

Passengers would receive different levels of compensation, depending on the size of the airline and length of the delay.

New compensation rules under the Canada Transport Act (screenshot/ gazette.gc.ca)

If a passenger is denied boarding because of overbooking, they are also eligible for up to $2,400 if delays are nine hours or more.

Compensation must also be applied for baggage that’s been damaged, or lost for 21 days or more. This could include reimbursement of the fees paid for that baggage.

vnc.editorial@blackpress.ca

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