(Submitted image)

B.C. martial arts gym refusing patrons who have been vaccinated, wear masks

Interior Health has already issued a ticket to Flow Academy for non-compliance with public health orders

A Kelowna martial arts academy that has banned the membership of vaccinated people and mask-wearers has previously been issued a ticket for violating COVID-19 provincial health orders.

Flow Academy is not accepting membership applications from anybody who has received a dose of the vaccine, according to a now-password-protected membership application form on its website. The Sutherland Avenue gym came to the decision after consultation with “health, wellness, and fitness-related facilities across Canada … as well as liability insurance companies.”

“To put it simply, the unknown health effects of the mRNA vaccines as well as reported side effects such as viral shedding, seizures, and death following the administration of these vaccines, are not covered by our liability,” reads the sign-up page, providing no citations to back up its claims.

Under its operating procedures listed on the application, the gym also forbids masks “for the health, safety, and protection of us and our members.”

A screenshot of a membership application webpage on flowacademy1.com on Tuesday morning, April 13. As of 2:30 p.m. on Tuesday, the page is password protected.

A screenshot of a membership application webpage on flowacademy1.com on Tuesday morning, April 13. As of 2:30 p.m. on Tuesday, the page is password protected.

A screenshot of the operating procedures section of Flow Academy’s now password-restricted online membership application form.

A screenshot of the operating procedures section of Flow Academy’s now password-restricted online membership application form.

Interior Health (IH) previously issued an order and a ticket to Flow Academy for non-compliance with provincial health orders back in February. The health authority is again following up with the academy due to “ongoing concerns and additional complaints.”

“There is no public health basis for a policy excluding people who are immunized against COVID-19. Immunization prevents the spread of disease and protects patrons and staff,” Interior Health stated in an email to the Capital News.

“All businesses need to follow public health orders and adult group activities are not currently allowed. Where businesses can operate within public health orders, they are still required to have COVID-19 safety plans in place to prevent transmission and protect patrons and staff.”

IH stated it will continue to investigate and take further enforcement actions, including potential closure, if non-compliance continues. The health authority points people seeking factual information on vaccines to immunizebc.ca.

Flow Academy did not immediately respond to the Capital News’ request for comment.

READ MORE: E-scooters now allowed on Kelowna roadways under provincial pilot program

READ MORE: Kelowna mayor claims spotty attendance at regional district meetings is not due to volunteerism

Do you have something to add to this story, or something else we should report on? Email: michael.rodriguez@kelownacapnews.com


@michaelrdrguez
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