Police arrest Jamie Bacon in 2009 in Abbotsford. (Black Press photo).

Appeal granted: Jamie Bacon to be tried for murder, conspiracy in Surrey Six killings

Charges were initially stayed against Jamie Bacon in 2017 for reasons unknown to the public

Jamie Bacon will be tried, again, on charges of murder and conspiracy in connection to the Surrey Six killings.

Charges of first-degree murder and conspiracy to commit murder in connection with the 2007 Surrey Six massacre were stayed against Bacon in December 2017. The reasons the judge granted the stayed ruling remain sealed.

Crown Counsel appealed that decision shortly after. On Thursday (May 21), the BC Court of Appeal announced it had granted Crown’s appeal following an in-camera hearing.

In the statement, the court said that the reasons on this decision are also sealed.

Six men, including two innocent bystanders, were gunned down in a highrise on Oct. 19, 2007 – dubbed the Surrey Six massacre.

Two men, Cody Rae Haevischer and Matthew James Johnston, were eventually convicted of six counts of first-degree murder and one count of conspiracy in the murder of rival gang member Corey Lal.

Bacon is also charged for counselling to commit murder in a separate incident in Mission on New Year’s Eve in 2008.

In that case, it was alleged Bacon planned a shooting that targeted Dennis Karbovanec. A mistrial was declared in April 2019 after the jury failed to reach a decision.

A new trial was expected to begin in March of this year, but was postponed due to the pandmic. Black Press Media has reached out to BC Prosecution Service for details.


@ashwadhwani
ashley.wadhwani@bpdigital.ca

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