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Surrey hospital part of 'groundbreaking' clinical trial

Trial examines two commonly used antibiotics
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Surrey Memorial Hospital is partnering with hospitals around the globe in a clinical trial to find optimal treatments for bloodstream infections.

Surrey Memorial Hospital is partnering with hospitals around the globe in a clinical trial to find optimal treatments for bloodstream infections.

Christopher Condin, PhD, the clinical research lead, said as antibiotic resistance has grown into a global concern, the medication must be used carefully.

This clinical trial examines two commonly used antibiotics (piperacillin-tazobactam and meropenem). While both medications are effective, one might be better for a certain patient than the other, Condin said.

“It’s about tailoring each treatment to the individual patient and making sure they have the best treatment available for their unique condition,” Condin said. “And the only way that we can do that really is with solid scientific evidence and scientific and clinical research.”

Participation in the trial is volunteer-based and the patients are told which drug they will receive. The research teams ensure that clinicians involved in the patient’s care consider the patient a suitable candidate for the study.

If a patient is eligible, a member of the clinical research team will meet with them, explain the study and ask if they want to participate.

“At all times, patient care is really at the forefront of what we do,” Condin said. “If something arises where a patient needs a different treatment, then we can just change their treatment protocol.”

Surrey Memorial is one of 12 hospitals in Canada, Italy and Israel participating in the study.

“We’re really grateful to our patients who participate in studies like this, and we’ve actually been really gratified,” Condin said. “We found that patients are really excited to participate and be part of the study and basically to be part of the solution.”

Trails like this one are made possible by funding from the Canadian Institute of Health Research and Surrey Hospital Foundation, Condin said. This study is just “one of several groundbreaking studies that we to brought Surrey Memorial.”

Dr. Kevin Afra, executive medical director for antimicrobial stewardship and infection control, said this is a “unique way” for Surrey Memorial Hospital to contribute vital research.

“Our patients are often underrepresented in clinical trials,” Afra said. “Our clinical teams including physicians, pharmacists, nurses and laboratory staff have embraced this important research, and patients have also been excited to participate.”



Anna Burns

About the Author: Anna Burns

I cover health care, non-profits and social issues-related topics for the Surrey Now-Leader.
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