The poster for the Fred Rogers documentary movie “Won’t You Be My Neighbor?”

‘Social justice successes’ in two doc films screened at free Surrey event

KPU to host double-header of movies profiling Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Fred Rogers

A double-header of award-winning documentary films aims to inform and inspire a Surrey audience on a Wednesday next month.

Featured on Feb. 6 will be RGB, a 2018 doc about U.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, and Morgan Neville’s Won’t You Be My Neighbor?, which profiles children’s television icon Fred Rogers.

The free event is presented by KDocs, Kwantlen Polytechnic University’s documentary film festival, and will be held at KPU’s Surrey Conference Centre, 12666 72nd Ave.

The “Spring Mini-Fest” will include a panel discussion and a keynote speech by Ellen Woodsworth, a former Vancouver city councillor and current consultant on urban issues; she is also the founder and chair of Women Transforming Cities, an advocacy organization.

“It is our hope that people will come away feeling both informed and inspired about what is possible, even as just one person,” Janice Morris, festival director of KDocs, said in a release.

“We want to present examples of social justice successes that have been hard-fought over many years of persistence, experience, and expertise. Both films profile individuals who, through very different methods and pathways, found a way to reach an audience with their message.”

The panel discussion will include Mebrat Beyene (WISH Foundation), Cicely Blain (Black Lives Matter-Vancouver), Chastity Davis (chair, Minister’s Advisory Council on Aboriginal Women for the Province of B.C.), Anita Huberman (CEO, Surrey Board of Trade), Debra Parkes (UBC professor and chair, Centre for Feminist Legal Studies) and Jinny Sims (Surrey-Panorama MLA).

Stated Morris: “This is a panel of formidable women from diverse backgrounds and industries – not-for-profit, community building, activism, indigenous rights and governance, law, education and politics.

“The intent is to use these films as a springboard and for the speakers/panelists to share with us their experience and expertise on the realities of being an activist, organizer, professional, and changemaker with various systems of power.”

The KDocs film festival, on a break for 2019, will return in 2020, according to KPU media rep Sucheta Singh.

While free to attend, the event on Feb. 6 requires registration to reserve a seat for each film, via email sent to rbg@kpu.ca and/or neighbour@kpu.ca.

It all starts at 3:30 p.m. with a reception, followed by keynote address at 4, screening of RBG at 4:30, panel at 6, intermission/reception at 6:45 and screening of Won’t You Be My Neighbour? at 7:15. The schedule and other event details are posted at kdocsff.com.

The KDocs mission, as posted on the website, is “to engage KPU’s various and varied communities, through documentary screenings and community dialogue, in critical thinking and understanding about ourselves, our communities, and our world.”

The vision is “to become the leading documentary film festival among Canadian universities, led by learners and educators from all of KPU’s communities in continuing to build a dynamic institution that engages and leads.”

• RELATED STORIES:

Surrey-raised murder victim remembered in new documentary film, from Sept. 2017.

Film industry ‘skyrocketing’ in Surrey, from Feb. 2018.



tom.zillich@surreynowleader.com

Like us on Facebook Follow us on Instagram and follow Tom on Twitter

Just Posted

Surrey public event to explore transition from RCMP to city police force

Surrey Board of Trade continuing its ‘Hot Topic Dialogue Series’ with this issue, on Tuesday Jan. 29

Surrey’s new Age-Well hub receives $3.5M in government funding

Hub is meant to drive development of healthy tech solutions to support healthy aging: SFU

Dancer gives props to Surrey school program for allowing him to leap to world stage

North Surrey grad Bynh Ho in ‘Loop, Lull’ show at Vancouver’s PuSh festival

KidSport’s Nite of Champions to honour championship Coastal FC squad

Annual South Surrey event will feature Vancouver Canucks coach Travis Green as keynote speaker

LISTEN: First responders share struggles with adversity in new Delta Police podcast

Bend Don’t Break allows police, firefighters and paramedics an opportunity so tell their stories

B.C. opioid crisis to get same world-renowned treatment approach as HIV/AIDS

A program that focuses on treatment as prevention will roll out Jan. 17

Olympian snowboarder Max Parrot diagnosed with Hodgkin’s lymphoma

Each year in Canada, approximately 900 people are diagnosed with Hodgkin’s lymphoma

‘Prince of Pot’ Marc Emery accused of sexual assault, harassment

Emery denied the allegations, but a Toronto woman says she is not the only one speaking out

Vancouver Island photographer makes National Geographic’s 2018 elite

Rare double honour for Marston from the 36 best Your Shots out of nearly 19,000 photos

Ex-Liberal candidate in Burnaby, B.C., says volunteer wrote controversial post

Karen Wang dropped out following online post singling out NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh’s ethnicity

Asteroids are smacking Earth twice as often as before

The team counted 29 craters that were no older than 290 million years

Canada’s arrest of Huawei exec an act of ‘backstabbing,’ Chinese ambassador says

China has called Canada’s arrest of Huawei chief financial officer Meng Wanzhou ‘politically motivated’

Manure company causing ‘toxic’ stink at Abbotsford school seeks permit

Property across from King Traditional Elementary cannot operate manure facility without permit

North Delta happening: week of Jan. 17

Events, courses and clubs listings for North Delta

Most Read