Mini Pop Kids in a promo photo.

UPDATE: Mini Pop Kids cancel concert date in Surrey

Victoria and Kelowna the other two B.C. stops for ‘high-energy, interactive’ touring show

* This story has been updated

SURREY — Sorry, kids, the Mini Pop Kids aren’t coming here to perform, after all.

A concert/dance party featuring the group of young singers was set for Monday, Feb. 12 at Surrey’s Bell Performing Arts Centre, but the show has been cancelled due to “a transportation and routing issue,” according to a post on the theatre’s website.

“They look forward to coming back to Surrey one day to perform their hits for their awesome fans,” says the post.

For ticket refunds, call the venue box office, 604-507-6355.

The group’s “high-energy, interactive concert” is designed to “give every boy, girl, and anyone of any age the chance to party like a POPstar,” featuring kid-friendly versions of hit songs by Taylor Swift, Bruno Mars and others.

Victoria and Kelowna are the other two B.C. stops on the Winnipeg-based group’s winter 2018 tour of Canada.

CLICK HERE for tour details.

(STORY CONTINUES BELOW VIDEO)

K-tel first launched the original Mini Pop Kids music line in the early 1980s.

The popular records featured talented children singing the current pop hits of the day, including classics such as “Cruel Summer,” “Video Killed The Radio Star” and “Rock This Town,” according to a post at minipopkids.com.

K-Tel re-launched the Mini Pop Kids music line in 2004, “continuing the tradition of creating family-friendly versions of current pop hits. Since then, families, teachers and coaches have welcomed Mini Pop Kids into their homes, classrooms and venues, making Mini Pop Kids an exciting and safe part of their daily lives.

“Packed with high positive energy, the Mini Pop Kids brand is about empowering kids to be confident and to shoot for their dreams.”

The current Mini Pop Kids group features young singers Aviv, Cheryl, Clayton, Izzy, Jadyn, Daniel, Jaylen, Maci and Ryan.

A new Mini Pop Kids 15 two-CD set features renditions of Portugal. The Man’s “Feel It Still,” Justin Bieber’s “Despacito,” Ed Sheeran’s “Castle On The Hill” and an original song called “Make It Pop!”



tom.zillich@surreynowleader.com

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