Gwynne Dyer says the Ukraine conflict is proving we haven’t escaped the deadly cycle of wars. (Submitted photo: KPU)

Gwynne Dyer says the Ukraine conflict is proving we haven’t escaped the deadly cycle of wars. (Submitted photo: KPU)

EVENT AT KPU

‘Planetary Maintenance Engineers’ talk in Surrey with historian/journalist Gwynne Dyer

Also, the KPU-backed KDocsFF film festival returns to in-person events for the first time since 2020

Historian and journalist Gwynne Dyer is coming to Surrey with two global problems on his mind, and potential solutions for both.

“Climate change and the war in Ukraine are at the top of the list in terms of potential for bad outcomes that would affect Canada,” Dyer says in a news release. “If the war in Ukraine gets out of hand, we are in a war with Russia. As for climate change, Vancouver is already facing it.”

Dyer is the guest speaker Jan. 18 during a President’s Dialogue Series event at Kwantlen Polytechnic University’s campus in Newton (12666 72 Ave.), in a Wednesday-morning gathering that starts at 10 a.m. in the Spruce Atrium.

The series, launched by KPU President Dr. Alan Davis, welcomes speakers who are leaders in the private and public sectors, both locally and globally.

Dyer has authored seven books and, after interviewing more than 50 climate scientists, he concludes it’s too late to avoid the major loss climate change will bring, but civilization can probably still be saved through discipline and technology.

“We are guilty of no crime but we have put ourselves in grave danger, and it’s up to us to find a way through it,” says Dyer, who has written two books on the topic and has a TV series in production.

Dyer, a military historian who has served in three navies, says the Ukraine conflict is proving we haven’t escaped the deadly cycle of wars. But the war is also a demonstration of restraint. Both sides have nuclear weapons, but neither have used them.

“We have made some progress, alas all the bad possibilities are still there, but we are holding them at bay,” he says.

Titled “Planetary Maintenance Engineers,” Dyer’s talk at KPU Surrey is open to the public and will include a question-and-answer period with the audience. Admission is free, but guests are asked to register in advance online, kpu.ca/president/dialogue-series.

Meantime, the KPU-backed KDocsFF film festival returns to in-person events for the first time since 2020.

The event, billed as “Metro Vancouver’s premier social justice film festival,” will screen 25 films from Feb. 22 to 26 at Vancouver International Film Centre (Vancity Theatre), with the theme of “People. Places. Power.”

The film titles include Unarchived, Writing with Fire, The YouTube Effect, Backlash: Misogyny in the Digital Age, The Scattering of Man, End of the Peace, The Doctrine of Recovery, Returning Home, The Monopoly of Violence and The Cost of Freedom: Refugee Journalists in Canada.

Tickets start at $5 per film. The schedule and other details are posted on kdocsff.com/upcoming-events.



tom.zillich@surreynowleader.com

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Climate changeKwantlen Polytechnic UniversityUkraine

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