Retailers feel the squeeze of their generous return policies

Retailers feel the squeeze of their generous return policies

Technology data tracking can clamp down on fraudulent abuse

Modern data monitoring has begun to allow retailers to crack down on perceived abuses of their item return policies.

“Returning things is an important element about retail businesses, as is how you handle returns can make or break you,” said Michael LeBlanc, senior retail advisor with the Retail Council of Canada.

“It’s an ongoing evolution and the pendulum for many retailers may be swinging too far in a generous direction for consumers at the expense of their bottom line. When you see people bringing back fake Christmas trees in January for a refund that is probably going too far.

“You can reach a point where it is not sustainable as a business to have a high level of returns.”

In the U.S. and Canada, retailers are hiring tech firms that specialize in tracking the in-store shopping habits of their customers.

One such company is The Retail Equation, based out of Irvine, Cal., which records and scores customers’ return activity, a service used by more than 34,000 stores across North America.

The company cites statistics that show stores lose $10.8 to $17.6 billion a year in the U.S. and $1.2 to $1.7 billion in Canada to fraudulent activity committed by customers.

In a recent profile in the Wall Street Journal, the company cited the example of a Best Buy customer in a California store who brought three cellphone cases back to the returns desk only to be told he would be barred from “making returns and exchanges” from that store for one year.

Consumer Protection BC says there is no law in B.C. that says a store must accept a return or provide a refund.

“Retailers are allowed to set their own refund/return policies,” said Amanda Parry, communications coordinator for the consumer protection branch.

Store retailers are walking a fine line, though, in trying to tighten return policies while online retailers are conditioning customers to expect lenient return policies, LeBlanc said.

He said that reflects the difference between the in-store “touch and feel” shopping experience for items as opposed to shopping on your phone or home computer.

“If you are buying clothes or shoes online, the tendency for many is to order multiple sizes because you don’t know exactly how they will fit. You keep the one that fits best and return the other items,” he said.

“What retailers are trying to do as an industry is really get a better handle on returns as that can really kill your business by virtue it drives up your cost of doing business, and ultimately everyone pays to off-set that cost. Nothing is for free. ”

LeBlanc says in many cases, once a product box is opened or used, it often either can’t be resold for hygiene or safety reasons, or is relegated to the B-channel discount store circuit. The retailer can be left holding the bag because product distributors generally won’t take unsaleable products back.

He said criminals have been aggressive in seeking out the weakest link in retailers’ return policies they can profit from, citing the example “porch pirates” who follow or monitor truck deliveries for online products, steal them after being delivered and seek to return the item for cash reimbursement.

“That is a part of doing business for online and retailers put up with that as best they can, but while there is a demand for that convenience the reality is 90 per cent of retail sales still come from people physically shopping in stores,” LeBlanc said.

“There is really an art and science for return policies for a given store. For loyal customers who spend a lot with your retail business which is now easier to keep track of, you might tend to be more loyal in return and part of that perhaps is having a little more forgiveness what they are buying and returning.”



barry.gerding@blackpress.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Burnsview Secondary in a Google Streetview photo.
UPDATE: Knife recovered after schoolyard stabbing in North Delta

One teen now out of hospital, and other has been released to custody of family with conditions

An example of a Surrey Police cruiser, showcased at Mayor Doug McCallum’s State of the City Address at Civic Hotel in May of 2019. (File photo: Amy Reid)
OUR VIEW: Surrey Police Service continues to draw from RCMP well

Again, it flies in the face of mayor’s election campaign pitch that Surrey needs a police force whose ranks live in this city

New United States Vice President Kamala Harris (left) and President Joe Biden (right) are sworn in at U.S. inauguration ceremonies Wednesday morning in Washington, D.C.. (Saul Loeb/Pool photos via AP)
Surrey Board of Trade highlights innovation, policy changes as new U.S. president sworn in

COVID-19, border re-opening among issues affecting city, SBOT says

The interventional oncology team at Surrey Memorial Hospital. The Surrey Hospitals Foundation has invested in innovative technologies to kickstart a new Interventional Oncology service at Surrey Memorial Hospital. (Submitted photo: Yvonne Chiang)
Surrey Memorial home to machines for ‘minimally invasive’ cancerous tumours treatments

Technology can freeze, burn tumours without need for surgery

Delta Police Constable Jason Martens and Dezi, a nine-year-old German Shepherd that recently retired after 10 years with Delta Police. (Photo submitted)
Delta Police dog retires on a high note after decade of service

Nine-year-old German Shepherd now fights over toys instead of chasing down bad guys

A woman writes a message on a memorial mural wall by street artist James “Smokey Devil” Hardy during a memorial to remember victims of illicit drug overdose deaths on International Overdose Awareness Day, in the Downtown Eastside of Vancouver, on Monday, August 31, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
B.C. paramedics respond to record-breaking number of overdose calls in 2020

On the front lines, COVID-19 has not only led to more calls, but increased the complexity

Snow is forecasted to appear in parts of Metro Vancouver this weekend. (Black Press Media files)
Snow forecasted for parts of Metro Vancouver this weekend

Environment Canada is predicting flurries and snow from Saturday to Monday evening

(Thesendboys/Instagram)
Video of man doing backflip off Vancouver bridge draws police condemnation

Group says in Instagram story that they ‘don’t do it for the clout’

A Langley woman said she was shaken by the angry encounter. (Google Maps)
Woman shaken after belligerent encounter with unmasked man in Langley store

A man angry about vaccines berated a fellow shopper, a witness said

Inspection of bridge crossing on a B.C. forest service road. (B.C. Forest Practices Board)
B.C. falling behind in maintenance of forest service roads

Auditor finds nearly half of bridges overdue for repair

(Black Press Media files)
Woman steals bottles of wine after brandishing stun baton in New Westminster

Police say the female suspect was wearing a beige trench coat with fur lining

Stand up paddleboarder Christie Jamieson is humbled to her knees as a pod of transient orcas put on a dramatic show on Jan. 19 in the Ucluelet Harbour. (Nora O’Malley photo)
UPDATED WITH VIDEO: Vancouver Island paddle boarder surrounded by pod of orcas

“My whole body is still shaking. I don’t even know what to do with this energy.”

Toronto’s Mass Vaccination Clinic is shown on Sunday January 17, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn
Canadian malls, conference centres, hotels offer up space for COVID vaccination centres

Commercial real estate association REALPAC said that a similar initiative was seeing success in the U.K.

Kamala Harris and Joe Biden are sworn into office on Wednesday, Jan. 20, 2021, at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C. (Saul Loeb/Pool Photo via AP)
Joe Biden has been sworn in as the 46th president of the United States

About 25,000 National Guard members have been dispatched to Washington

Most Read